Category Archives: Humanitarian Issues

Dan Caplan and University of Iowa Students, Thursday, May 9th, 2019

“University of Iowa Students’ Experience with the International Student Observership Program in India”

Caplan_D_12_18_07Web.jpgDr. Caplan participates in intramural dental practice and studies outcomes related to endodontic treatment; decision-making in endodontics; relationships between oral and systemic diseases; and evaluation of diagnostic tests. He has put together numerous global research programs for University of Iowa dental students and global health students including the Pondicherry International Student Observership Program that Kayla and Monika will be discussing with him.
Kayla Erps photoKayla grew up in Grimes, Iowa and is a second year student at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. She is very passionate about community outreach, working with underprivileged populations, and traveling the world! Kayla is excited to share her experiences from India with you all and hope to paint a vivid picture for you that will be informative, educational, and eye-opening.
Picture_Monika Reddy Bhuma.pngMonika is a student of the Iowa Institute of Public Health Research and Policy. She has been in health case competitions and global projects focused on sustainability and global health.

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, South Asia, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

University of Iowa Fulbright Student Awardees, April 25th, 2019

University of Iowa Fulbright Student Awardees Discuss Their Future Assignments
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Jeffrey Clark.jpgJeffrey Clark
Bio: Jeff was born in Virginia on December 6, 1996, to a Korean mother and an American father. He did not speak Korean growing up, but he traveled to South Korea from 2017-2018 through a University of Iowa study abroad program where he studied Korean history and language at Ewha Woman’s University. He is currently planning on a long term career in United States Foreign      Service.
Destination and Assignment: South Korea. English Teaching Assistant
Alex BareAlex Bare
Bio: Alex will graduate in May 2019 with a B.A. in International Relations and Spanish alongside a minor in Arabic. Originally from about two miles outside Maysville in the Quad Cities area, he studied abroad in Cochabamba, Bolivia in Fall 2018 and went on to become the Outreach Director of Spectrum UI and Director of Justice and Equity in the executive cabinet of the University of Iowa Student Government. He is very excited to embark on what he hopes to be the start of a long career in Colombia and Neighboring countries.
Destination and Assignment: Colombia, English Teaching Assistant
Alexa FrankAlexa Frank
Bio: Alexa Frank is a MFA candidate in creative writing (fiction) at the Iowa Writers Workshop. She grew up in the suburbs of New York city and attended Bard College as an undergraduate. Alexa is the current fiction editor of The Iowa Review and a creative writing instructor at the University of Iowa. In her free time, she tries to catch up on reading, TV and sleep.
Destination and assignment: Tokyo, Japan. Research. Alexa will research canonical and contemporary depictions of mental illness in Japanese literature in support of a novel in progress.
Michael Parisi Mercado.jpgMichael Parisi-Mercado
Bio: Michael is a third year Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Public Health student at the University of Iowa. He completed his undergraduate education in Guayama, Puerto Rico where he calls home. He aspires to work with underserved populations in the field of infectious diseases. Michael is bilingual in English and Spanish, he enjoys cooking, listening to music, taking pictures, and exploring new places.
Destination and assignment: Romania. Research. Michael’s research will involve working with pharmacists to help improve the health and care of patients living with HIV/AIDS

 

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Filed under Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized, University of Iowa

Elizabeth Marilla-Kapp and Caitlin Chenus, Thursday, April 18, 2019

image1.jpg“The Relationship Between Mental Health Access and International Human Rights Standards”
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Elizabeth Marilla-Kapp will earn her MSW from the UI School of Social Work in May with an emphasis in access to mental health resources and creative mental health interventions. She also earned her MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She has worked with several local agencies serving people experiencing homelessness, crisis, and mental illness and is honored to have directed the local free breakfast cafe for several years. She was a Kenneth Cmiel intern last summer which supported her work exploring the relationship between mental health access and international human rights standards.

4-11-2019 Chenus head shot.png“France’s Flawed Asylum Policies; Changes Needed in Today’s World” 

Caitlin Chenus is a senior at the University of Iowa and a Rex Honey Intern at the University site of Iowa Center for Human Rights. She pursued a research project in France this past summer with support from International Programs and the Stanley family. She will be graduating in May of 2019 and going on to attend law school. She plans to study international and comparative law with a focus on immigration.

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Filed under Europe, Governance Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

Chris Buresh, Wednesday, April 10th, 2019

Chris Buresh“Update on the Current Condition in Haiti”

          Chris Buresh works as an ambassador to Haiti through the Haiti Community Health Initiative (CHI). He specifically continues to invest healthcare resources into the rural community of Arcahaie, Hiati, with 5 medical and 2 surgical trips per year along with a CHI staff of local Haitians who work year around.
          The most important aspect of CHI is its ability to provide healthcare in solidarity for the Haitian community in hopes that someday the Haiti will acquire the resources to be self sufficient in their care and perhaps even assist us. Fostering a relationship of support, local education and local community helps CHI most effectively treat patients and provides the framework for Dr. Buresh’s talk on the current condition of local Haitians.
Further Haitian Healthcare Background
          Haiti is situated on the Western third of the island of Hispaniola. Of the country’s estimated 10.5 million citizens, 75% are estimated to live below the poverty line, with the majority of the population living on less than $2 per day. Various natural disasters including the earthquake of January 2010 have only worsened the situation. Much of the Haitian population can be diagnosed with deficiencies of iron, vitamin A, iodine, protein, calories, or any combination of these. Overarching malnutrition leads to stunted growth and development in the Haitian population. Infectious diseases including HIV, TB, and lymphatic filariasis, among others, add another layer to the multitude of factors that play into health inequity throughout Haiti.
          Dr. Chris Buresh grew up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and graduated from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn. and from the University of Iowa College of Medicine. He did his pediatrics residency at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, followed by an emergency medicine residency back at the University of Iowa. Since then, he has been the assistant residency director in emergency medicine at UI. He has done medical work in India, Peru, and the Dominican Republic, and has been working in Haiti since 2002. Chris lives in Coralville with his wife and 3 kids.
         He also serves as the American College of Emergency Medicine Medical Director, Keokuk County Ambulance Service Representative, and State EMS Advisory Council Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine.

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

Edith Parker, Thursday, March 28th, 2019

parker_edith.jpg“Public Health is Global Health”

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          Nationally recognized expert in community-based participatory behavior Dr. Edith Parker promotes innovative ideas to improve major social determinants of health and health disparities. She is a renowned researcher in community-based participatory analysis, which emphasizes the active involvement of community members in all aspects of the research process. Her extensive background in research as well as her interest in aiding in the prevention of diseases and helping people live healthier lives qualifies her as a well rounded specialist in her field of work. Dr. Parker’s research focuses on the design, implementation and evaluation of community health promotion interventions to improve health status and reduce racial disparities in health. Her expertise also includes translating and disseminating research findings for program and policy change.

Dr. Edith Parker serves as Dean of the University of Iowa College of Public Health. She also directs the Prevention Research Center for Rural Health, based in the University of Iowa College of Public Health. She formerly served as Departmental Executive Officer of the University of Iowa Department of Community and Behavioral Health. Her work centers on engaging community members in the design, implementation, and evaluation of research interventions, and translating and disseminating research findings for program and policy change.

Dr. Parker holds a bachelor’s degree from Davidson College, as well as Master of Public Health and Doctor of Public Health degrees from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She served on the faculty of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan before joining the University of Iowa in 2010.

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

Gabriele Villarini, Wednesday, March 13th, 2019

villarini_gabriele-20151012-no-04bis.jpg“Flooding and Rainfall Associated with Tropical Cyclones”

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          Rainfall associated with landfalling tropical cyclones plays a crucial role in terms of rainfall extremes and climatology in many areas of the world, from the tropics to the mid-latitudes. The flooding caused by these storms have been responsible for significant societal and economic impacts, with hundreds of fatalities and losses in the billions of dollars. In the United States alone, Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria (2017) and Hurricanes Florence and Michael (2018) represent some of the latest examples of the devastation associated with these storms. Therefore, an improved understanding and prediction of the heavy rainfall and flooding associated with tropical cyclones can provide basic information towards improving our preparedness, mitigation and management of these hazards.
          This presentation will provide an overview of the heavy rainfall and flooding associated with tropical cyclones using a combination of observations and outputs from climate models. The results will provide a broad geographical and temporal view of the hazards associated with landfalling tropical cyclones, as well as recent insights into their predictability.
          Gabriele Villarini is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Iowa, and the Director of IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering. He received his M.S. in Civil Engineering in 2003 from the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” and his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 2008 from the University of Iowa; he also received his Executive MBA from the Tippie School of Business at the University of Iowa in 2018. He was a researcher and Willis Research Fellow in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University from 2008 to 2012.
         His research interests focus on flood hydrology, extreme events, hydroclimatology, and climate predictions and projections. He has received a number of national and international awards, including the “Hydrological Sciences Outstanding Young Scientist Award” by the European Geosciences Union (2013), the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award and the Editor’s Award – Journal of Climate” by the American Meteorological Society (2014), and the James B. Macelwane Medal by the American Geophysical Union (2016). He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (2016). He has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers, including articles in Nature, Science, Nature Climate Change and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He served as a member of the American Geophysical Union Precipitation Committee and of the U.S.-CLIVAR Working Group on Hurricanes and Climate.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

Keith Sahm, Wednesday, February 20th, 2019

Force_Blue_Keith.jpg“Saving the World’s Coral Reefs”

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          For over the last 20 years, Keith has been in a managerial role of Sunset House in Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands. He is an accomplished diver, strategist, hotelier & marketer. Offering a rare blend of creative and operational strengths, he is a former board member of the Diving Equipment and Marketing Association (DEMA) and Cayman Islands Tourism Association (CITA). Keith was one of the first to install coral farms in the Cayman Islands and co-founder of the island’s NGO “Save Cayman”. He has been a guest speaker at numerous DEMA events and was named “Diver of the Year” in 2015 by Beneath the Sea for his role in promoting SCUBA recreation, training, safety and advocate for the seas. He is also the Co-Founder of a “mission therapy” nonprofit known as Force Blue.
          FORCE BLUE is the only nonprofit organization in the world that provides “mission therapy” for former combat divers – individuals in whom governments around the world have invested millions to create the best possible underwater and maritime operators – by retraining, retooling and deploying them on missions of conservation, preservation and restoration.
          By uniting the community of Special Operations veterans with the world of marine science and conservation in one, mission-focused program, FORCE BLUE has created a model of caring, cooperation and positive change with the power to restore lives and restore the planet.
          If you would like to know more or contribute to their cause, visit: https://forceblueteam.org/our-story/

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

T. Bram Elias & Stella Elias, Thursday, February 14th, 2019

Bram Elias“Immigration in the Era of Trump and Brexit”

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Professor Bram Elias joined the clinic in 2014 and has directed the Clinic’s immigration practice since 2015. He previously worked as an immigration attorney in private practice in downtown Iowa City, where his work focused on federal immigration law, removal defense, immigration-related family law issues in state court, and immigration-related post-conviction review and habeas corpus litigation in state and federal courts. Professor Elias’s students practice before federal immigration courts and administrative bodies, the federal Board of Immigration Appeals, and state and federal courts at both the trial and appellate levels.

       Stella Burch Elias joined the Iowa Law faculty in 2012, after a two-year appointment as a Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School. She teaches civil procedure, foundations of international law, immigration law, and comparative law, and directs Iowa’s London Law Program. Her research involves public international and comparative law, with a focus on United States and foreign immigration and nationality laws.
elias       Professor Elias was voted Professor of the Year by the law school student body for 2017-18. In 2016-17, she was nominated by the College of Law faculty and students for the University of Iowa’s campus-wide President and Provost Award for Teaching Excellence. In 2014-2015 she received the James N. Murray Faculty Award, given each year to one tenure-track faculty member at the University of Iowa, in recognition of outstanding teaching and assistance to students, exceptional research and writing, and dedicated service to the University and the surrounding community

 

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Governance Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Blake Rupe, February, 6th, 2019

rupe“Plastics in the Oceans”

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       Blake is the Sustainable Water Development Program Coordinator in IIHR Hydroscience and Engineering. She comes to the College of Engineering after a background in startups and conservation.
       Blake received her Master’s degree in International Studies and focused her research on the different human drivers behind waste proliferation and marine debris presence. She conducted projects in several areas of this field – from conducting field research in quantifying and classifying the waste problem all the way to identifying and critiquing systemic, institutional obstacles to improving the waste situation.
       After graduation, Blake utilized her passion for conservation and skills in web design and development to build mobile conservation and sustainability apps, known as Re-App. She has taken part in the Iowa Startup Accelerator in Cedar Rapids and was named a finalist for the Iowa Women of Innovation award.
       As a conservationist, Blake is passionate about promoting clean water and community engagement to improve environmental health.

 

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Environmental Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2019, Uncategorized

Mercedes Niño-Murcia, Wednesday, December 12th, 2018

mercedes“How Mass Migration Is Changing Our Understanding of Language and Bilingualism”

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With people, languages, and cultures in motion everywhere, sociolinguists are learning to take mobility rather than territorial language community as its baseline assumption. Services, information, networking and communication run teeming across all frontiers. Nothing stays put. Language-oriented social scientists are embracing a new frame known as the “mobility turn.” We distinguish three interacting regimes of mobility: international refugee movement, international tourism or life-style travel, and labor flows. They morph into one another in patterns that aren’t captured by our habitual terms migration and diaspora.
As identities are renegotiated every element of dialogue among groups becomes more fluid. Linguists are working out how mobility reconfigures words, meanings, and multilingual practices down to details of daily neighborhood life. I will illustrate some of the consequences for legal interactions in our Midwestern communities.
Mercedes Niño-Murcia is Professor of Hispanic Linguistics in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Iowa. She is a sociolinguist currently focusing on language ideologies as they affect bilingual communities in Latin America and the United States. She is also interested in language policy and in how sociolinguistic inequalities affect indigenous and/or migrant groups in both rural and urban settings. Her past work includes the ethnographic study of writers, archives, and vernacular literacies in Peru (The Lettered Mountain, Duke University Press, 2011, with Frank Salomon). In a comparative vein she studies histories of writing and debates about spelling in various languages worldwide. Her current research deals with language, migration, and hierarchies of class and among Spanish-speaking immigrants in the US.

 

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Filed under Education, Fall 2018, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized

Sunny Ho, Wednesday, November 28th, 2018

“A Multicultural Perspective to See Mental Health: Theories and Applications”

Ho_professional picSunny Ho is a fourth year Ph.D candidate in Counseling Psychology Program. His research interests are social justice issues and multiculturalism in mental health settings, such as race/racism, class/classism, etc. In addition, he is interested in studying barriers and challenges Asian international individuals encounter in terms of seeking mental health services. He is currently working on his dissertation about Chinese indigenous healing methods. He is passionate about intergroup dialogue and social activism work for underrepresented students on UI campus.
YUNKYOUNG-GARRISON.jpgYunkyoung (Yun) Garrison is a Ph.D. candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Iowa under the mentorship of William Ming Liu, Ph.D. Yun moved to Iowa from South Korea in 2013. Her research looks at the dynamics of social class privilege and classism in the US and international communities as well as multicultural and vocational issues among international students, immigrants, and children of immigrants. Yun has gained clinical experiences with diverse clienteles, including children/adolescents at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC), students at the University Counseling Service (UCS) at the University of Iowa and Student Health and Counseling Services (SHACS) at Grinnell College, students/community members in Women’s Resource and Action Center (WRAC), and middle school students in rural communities through career programing (Project HOPE).
Rosaline-web.jpgRosaline Lin is a third year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology Program. Her research interests are multicultural issues in mental health settings and career development of high-achieving students with disabilities. She is also interested in studying the function of creative arts in career and psychological interventions. Rosaline is passionate about working with underrepresented students on and off campus and supporting individuals in building strengths to cope with adversities in life.

 

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Filed under Education, Fall 2018, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized

Chris Rossi, Wednesday, November 14th, 2018

rossi photo“The Migingo Dispute between Uganda and Kenya: What the world’s tiniest island tells us about international law and relations.” 

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Christopher Rossi directs Humanities Iowa and is an adjunct faculty member at the Iowa Law College. He has a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and law degrees from the University of London and the University of Iowa. He worked on deterrence issues for the Arms Control Association, a division of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and on verification issues at the UN International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria. He has taught at American University, UNI, the Mongolian Diplomatic Academy, and Pusan National University.

He served on the White House National Security Council as director of human rights and humanitarian affairs. He has published articles on the law of war, legal history, international courts and criminal tribunals, polar affairs, Latin America, and on the law of the sea. He has co-edited two books on international affairs and has authored three books, the latest titled Sovereignty and Territorial Temptation (Cambridge University Press, 2017). He has also edited a chapbook on the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition, which was distributed to 20,000 5th grade students of Iowa history, and a documentary collection of Iowa photographs by the American master, David Plowden. His current research interest is on Whiggish International Law: The Monroe Doctrine, Elihu Root, and International Law in the Americas.

Migingo is a small island in the eastern waters of Africa’s Lake Victoria. It is half the size of the Hawkeye football field. For as long as anyone can remember, it was an uninhabited pinprick that happens to straddle the water boundary between Uganda and Kenya. Recent changes in the Lake Victoria’s water table have turned the island into a perfect waystation for hunting the much-desired Nile perch. This newly discovered value of the islet has turned it into a dangerous flashpoint in the deteriorating relations between Uganda and Kenya. Who owns this island? The answer presents unsettling questions about the history of international law, colonialism, genocide, and the future of the International Criminal Court in Africa.

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Filed under Africa, Fall 2018, Governance Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized

Dr. M.R. Rajagopal, Tuesday, September 18th, 2018

HIPPOCRATIC-POSTER“Palliative Care is Everyone’s Business : Community Participation in Healthcare”

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Dr. M.R. Rajagopal, a native of India, is both a palliative care physician and an anesthesiologist. He studied palliative care at Trivandrum Medical College and anesthesiology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. Dr. Rajagopal held the position as Professor and Head of Anesthesiology at Calicut Medical College.

Following his time there he served as a professor and Head of Pain and Palliative Medicine at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences. While holding this position, Rajagopal kickstarted the first university approved graduate program in India in Pain and Palliative Medicine.

Dr. Rajagopal was also key in the formation of the Pain and Palliative Care Society in 1993. A decade later he created “Pallium India”, a charitable trust that created two Palliative care centers, and established palliative care services around the country of India. A 2018 nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize, he has been referred to as the ‘father of palliative care in India’ (first by the New York Times) in honor of his significant contribution to the Indian palliative care scene. Dr. Rajagopal was awarded the ‘Padma Shri,’ one of the highest civilian honors, by the government of India in 2018 and ‘Alison Des Forges Award for Extraordinary Activism’ by Human Rights Watch in 2014.
Dr. Rajagopal was also named one of the “30 Most Influential Leaders in Hospice and Palliative Care” by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Rajagopal even has a feature length film that focuses on his life. The film Hippocratic follows the life of Dr. Rajagopal and his dream of creating a “pain free India.”

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Filed under Fall 2018, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized

Dr. John Canady, Wednesday, September 5th, 2018

canady_john_0“Healthcare Delivery in Developing Countries”

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John Canady, a native of Jefferson, Iowa, received his Bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Grinnell College in 1980. Following graduation John enrolled in the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Dr. Canady completed two residencies, the first in Otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, was completed in 1988. He then completed a residency in Plastic Surgery at the University of Kansas.

Dr. Canady made his mark at Iowa as Professor of Plastic Surgery at UIHC, where he practice clinically, conducted research, and instructed medical students, residents, and fellows. John also served a one year term as President of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons from 2008-2009. After departing UIHC, Dr. Canady became the Medical Director for Johnson & Johnson.

Dr. Canady’s expertise has been valued by patients over the world including a current University of Iowa College Medicine student, Ethan Craig. Ethan, originally from Korea, was adopted by a family in Cedar Rapids. Ethan had a successful cleft lip and palate surgery by Dr. Canady. 

Throughout Dr. Canady’s career, he has always been deeply involved in volunteer medical services. Most notably, Dr. Canady is the Co-Founder and Medical team leader of Iowa MOST. Iowa MOST is a 501c3 group that travels to underdeveloped countries to provide life-changing surgical care to children in need of medical attention.

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Filed under Fall 2018, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized

Mariola Espinosa ,Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Mariola Head Shot“Surviving Hurricanes in  Puerto Rico”

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Mariola Espinosa is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Iowa and an Associate Professor Adjunct in the Section of the History of Medicine at Yale University. She is a historian of medicine and public health in the Caribbean and Latin America. Her current research looks at medical understandings of fever in the French, British, Spanish, and U.S. Caribbean empires. The high level of language proficiency she possesses in English, French, and Spanish is understandably a great aid in this research.

She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on the history of Cuba; disease, public health, and empire; the history of medicine and public health in Latin America; disease in the Caribbean; global history of Latin American science and medicine; and readings on disease in the Caribbean.

Devastated by a string of hurricanes in 2017, the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico has struggled to recover from the widespread damage to lives and infrastructure. However, hurricanes are a regular occurrence in the Gulf of Mexico and Puerto Rico is no stranger to them. Mariola Espinosa will have a conversation on how the country has managed to cope with such hostile weather.

 

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Filed under Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Sara Mitchell ,Thursday, November 30, 2017

Mitchell_2017_0

“Patterns of Maritime Conflicts, 1900-2010”

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Sara McLaughlin Mitchell is the F. Wendell Miller Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa. She has authored five books, the most recent being What Do We Know About Civil Wars? and has edited several special journal issues and published more than forty journal articles and book chapters. She is the recipient of several major research awards from the Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, and the United States Agency for International Development. Her areas of expertise include international conflict, political methodology, and gender issues in academia. Professor Mitchell is co-founder of the Journeys in World Politics workshop, a mentoring workshop for junior women studying international relations. She has received several prestigious awards, the most recent being the Quincy Wright Distinguished Scholar Award (2015) from the International Studies Association, and served as President of the Peace Science Society.

There is little understanding of their generalizable patterns with respect to claim onset and management. This project utilizes data from the Issue Correlates of War (ICOW) on diplomatic claims over maritime areas globally from 1900-2010 to explore patterns in states’ interactions over territorial and resource issues of the seas. Initial results suggest that potential oil resources are more dangerous for producing militarized disputes than extracted oil resources (or none). Migratory fish stocks also raise the risks for militarized confrontation over maritime claims. Surprisingly, maritime claims are more likely to occur between wealthier and more democratic countries, although escalation of such disputes to fatal militarized disputes is rare. These findings will help us understand how prominent cases like the South China Sea disputes fit into the broader landscape of maritime conflicts.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, War & Conflict

Ubah Cristina Ali Farah, Thursday, September 28, 2017

Ubah“To Leave in the Afternoon: Inheriting the Language of a Civil War”

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Ubah Cristina Ali Farah is a Somali-Italian novelist, performer, teacher and social activist. Her two novels, Madre piccola [Little Mother, Indiana UP 2011] and Il Comandante del fiume [The Commander of the River] tell stories of the Somali civil war and its refugees in Italy. In 2006, she was awarded the Lingua Madre National Literary Prize, and in 2008, the Vittorini Prize. She has a PhD in African Studies from the University of Naples; currently she lives in Brussels. She is participating in the International Writing Program’s 2017 Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Born in Italy to a Somali father and an Italian mother, Ubah Cristina Ali Farah grew up in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, attending an Italian school there until the Somalia Civil War broke out in 1991.  Ali Farah and her family subsequently relocated to Pécs, Hungary, and then later moved back to her birthplace, Verona, Italy.  In the intervening years, she has carried with her a Somali language that was radically re-shaped by the conflict and stories that seem like her own memories.  Farah draws on Eva Hoffman’s concept of “postmemory” to describe the effect of these traumatic experiences on the entire generation born after the Civil War.  In this lunchtime lecture, Ubah Cristina Ali Farah will share her experiences as a writer addressing violence, civil division, and national memory.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please remember to renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

Greg Carmichael, Wednesday, September 20, 2017

“Current Environmental Challenges”gcarmich

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Gregory R. Carmichael is the Karl Kammermeyer Professor of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the University of Iowa and he is the Co-Director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research.  Greg also serves as the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research for the College of Engineering.

He has done extensive research related to air quality and its environmental impacts with over 280 journal publications, and he is a leader in the development and application of chemical transport models at scales ranging from local to global. The majority of his recent papers deal with the development and application of chemical transport models (CTM) to studies in regional atmospheric chemistry, air quality and climate. He is a member of the scientific steering committee for the UNEP ABC Asia project. He also serves as chair of the Scientific Advisory Group for the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmospheric Watch Urban Meteorology and Environment project, which is focused on building capacity worldwide to improve air quality forecasts and related services.

Much has changed since the 2015 historic Paris Climate Accord.  Even though the U.S. has expressed its plan to withdraw from the agreement, there remain many efforts at local, regional and global scales to address climate and environmental change. Post-Paris opportunities for addressing climate and the challenges to come with them will be discussed.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please remember to renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Fall 2017, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Technology, Uncategorized

H.S. Udaykumar & Jerry Anthony, Thursday April 13, 2017

“Women’s Health and the Environment: Going Up in Smoke”

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About one-third of the planet’s people use wood every day for fuel. Jerry Anthony and Udaykumar, along with colleagues across the University of Iowa, have been researching causes and consequences of firewood use in the developing world. This talk will focus on the many multi-disciplinary and global issues that interweave into a web of complex problems stemming from a simple act of sustenance: cooking. The daily harvesting and burning of biomass by women for cooking purposes half a world away
connects to us due to its impact on climate, forest loss, environmental degradation and health affects. Anthony and Udaykumar will discuss the importance of this problem not only to women and children in the global south, but to all of us.

[This year’s Provost’s Global Forum will feature “Women’s Health and the Environment: Going Up in Smoke” from April 12-14! More information is available here.]

Picture1H.S. Udaykumar received a Bachelor of Technology from the Indian Institute of Technology in Chennai, India, in 1988 and went on to pursue a Master’s and PhD from the University of Florida. He works with the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research in Hydroscience and Engineering, and is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Institue of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Biomedical Engineering Society. Udaykumar is passionate about implementing sustainable designs not only in developing countries, but also shifting policies and energy choices in an industrial setting. He initiated and led the India solar cook-stove project, bringing groups of UI students to rural areas in Rajasthan to develop and implement more efficient designs for cooking.

Anthony HSJerry Anthony received a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Kerala, India, in 1989 and went on to pursue a Master’s in Town Planning from the School of Planning and Architecture in New Delhi, India, and a Ph.D. in 2000 in Urban and Regional Planning from Florida State University. Anthony’s major research and teaching interests center around housing and community development issues, particularly affordable housing policies; growth management, where he is concerned with the benefits and costs of growth management distribution across different income populations; and land, infrastructure and housing market issues in the developing regions of South Asia and Latin America. He has served as chair of Iowa City’s Housing and Community Development Commission and member of the Iowa City Sit Housing Taskforce, and Director of the Housing Policy Program at the PPC.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, South Asia, Spring 2017

Blake Rupe, Thursday March 2, 2017

080415rupe“Health, Wealth, and Waste: Social Entrepreneurship in Global Health and Beyond”

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Each person in the U.S., on average, creates 4.6 pounds of waste each day. What happens to that waste? It affects everything we do in several ways, ranging from human health to environmental wellness. This lecture will define the social and cultural aspects of garbage as well as develop an understanding of the link between garbage, human health and environmental health. The life cycle of our modern waste products, their detrimental impacts on human populations and ecosystems, and implications for the future of global sustainability will be explored. The lecture will end with discussing the past, present and future solutions to the growing environmental threat.

Blake Rupe is an Iowa-based digital content manager, editor, instructor and passionate conservationist. As the digital content strategist for the University of Iowa, Blake publishes web content and tracks data points that drive collegiate efforts. Her strengths lie in identifying trends and providing insights for the management team. As an Adjunct Instructor, Blake uses her tech skills to research, develop and teach tech courses for the Global Health Department that focus on the intersection of entrepreneurship, sustainability and global health.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2017