Category Archives: Health & Medicine

H.S. Udaykumar & Jerry Anthony, Thursday April 13, 2017

“Women’s Health and the Environment: Going Up in Smoke”

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About one-third of the planet’s people use wood every day for fuel. Jerry Anthony and Udaykumar, along with colleagues across the University of Iowa, have been researching causes and consequences of firewood use in the developing world. This talk will focus on the many multi-disciplinary and global issues that interweave into a web of complex problems stemming from a simple act of sustenance: cooking. The daily harvesting and burning of biomass by women for cooking purposes half a world away
connects to us due to its impact on climate, forest loss, environmental degradation and health affects. Anthony and Udaykumar will discuss the importance of this problem not only to women and children in the global south, but to all of us.

[This year’s Provost’s Global Forum will feature “Women’s Health and the Environment: Going Up in Smoke” from April 12-14! More information is available here.]

Picture1H.S. Udaykumar received a Bachelor of Technology from the Indian Institute of Technology in Chennai, India, in 1988 and went on to pursue a Master’s and PhD from the University of Florida. He works with the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research in Hydroscience and Engineering, and is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Institue of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Biomedical Engineering Society. Udaykumar is passionate about implementing sustainable designs not only in developing countries, but also shifting policies and energy choices in an industrial setting. He initiated and led the India solar cook-stove project, bringing groups of UI students to rural areas in Rajasthan to develop and implement more efficient designs for cooking.

Anthony HSJerry Anthony received a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Kerala, India, in 1989 and went on to pursue a Master’s in Town Planning from the School of Planning and Architecture in New Delhi, India, and a Ph.D. in 2000 in Urban and Regional Planning from Florida State University. Anthony’s major research and teaching interests center around housing and community development issues, particularly affordable housing policies; growth management, where he is concerned with the benefits and costs of growth management distribution across different income populations; and land, infrastructure and housing market issues in the developing regions of South Asia and Latin America. He has served as chair of Iowa City’s Housing and Community Development Commission and member of the Iowa City Sit Housing Taskforce, and Director of the Housing Policy Program at the PPC.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, South Asia, Spring 2017

Blake Rupe, Thursday March 2, 2017

080415rupe“Health, Wealth, and Waste: Social Entrepreneurship in Global Health and Beyond”

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Each person in the U.S., on average, creates 4.6 pounds of waste each day. What happens to that waste? It affects everything we do in several ways, ranging from human health to environmental wellness. This lecture will define the social and cultural aspects of garbage as well as develop an understanding of the link between garbage, human health and environmental health. The life cycle of our modern waste products, their detrimental impacts on human populations and ecosystems, and implications for the future of global sustainability will be explored. The lecture will end with discussing the past, present and future solutions to the growing environmental threat.

Blake Rupe is an Iowa-based digital content manager, editor, instructor and passionate conservationist. As the digital content strategist for the University of Iowa, Blake publishes web content and tracks data points that drive collegiate efforts. Her strengths lie in identifying trends and providing insights for the management team. As an Adjunct Instructor, Blake uses her tech skills to research, develop and teach tech courses for the Global Health Department that focus on the intersection of entrepreneurship, sustainability and global health.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2017

Don Letendre, Wednesday February 1, 2017

picture1“The Global Impact of Drugs”

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From small communities to corporate enterprises, drugs and their impact are reshaping the healthcare and economic landscape, making the educational journey of today’s pharmacists highly demanding and competitive. Peoples’ perceptions about drugs and their impact on society are limited to what they see and read. During this lecture Dr. Letendre will shed light on some of the new and fascinating ways in which drugs are impacting society, positively and negatively, including astonishing new medications that are helping to treat and cure maladies that were once thought untreatable and incurable.

Donald E. Letendre is Dean and Professor, University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. Following completion of his Doctorate in Pharmacy and clinical residency at the University of Kentucky, he served as Assistant Director and Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center; spent nearly two decades on the staff of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) serving, for much of that time, as Director of Accreditation Services; and, was Dean and Professor at the University of Rhode Island and Executive Secretary of the Rhode Island State Crime Laboratory Commission immediately prior to his responsibilities at Iowa. As a clinical practitioner, educator, association staff member, and now academic administrator, Dean Letendre has been privileged to serve countless students and postgraduate residents throughout his career, and has actively participated in the development and implementation of standards that have helped shape pharmacy practice and residency and technician training programs worldwide.

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Filed under Economics, Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2017, U.S. Foreign Policy

Ambassador John Lange, Tuesday October 25, 2016

picture1“Global Health and Sustainable Development”

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From 1991 to 1995 at the U.S. Mission to the UN in Geneva, Lange managed humanitarian and refugee assistance channeled through international organizations.  He also had tours of duty in the State Department Bureaus of African Affairs, Western Hemisphere Affairs and Management in Washington and at U.S. Embassies in Togo, France and Mexico. The United Nations Foundation was launched in 1998 with a $1 billion gift from Ted Turner to support the United Nations causes. The United Nations Foundation links the UN’s work with others around the world, mobilizing the energy and expertise of business and non-governmental organizations to help the UN tackle issues including climate change, global health, peace and security, women’s empowerment, poverty eradication, energy access, and U.S.-UN relations.    Ambassador Lange’s visit to Iowa is sponsored by the Iowa United Nations Association, the state affiliate of the United Nations Association of the USA, a program of the United Nations Foundation.

Ambassador John E. Lange (Ret.) serves as the primary focal point for the UN Foundation’s global health diplomacy activities. Prior to joining the Foundation in July 2013, Lange spent four years at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation working with African governments to improve public health.  He has served as co-chair of the Global Polio    Eradication Initiative’s Polio Partners Group since its launch in April 2012. Ambassador Lange had a 28-year career in the Foreign Service at the U.S. Department of State, including service as Special Representative on Avian and        Pandemic Influenza; Deputy Inspector General; Deputy U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator at the inception of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief; and Associate Dean at the Foreign Service Institute. He was Ambassador to Botswana from 1999 to 2002 and simultaneously served as Special Representative to the Southern African Development Community.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Fall 2016, Health & Medicine, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy

Theodore Powers, Tuesday April 19, 2016

Theodore Powers“Milestone Breakthroughs in the Fight Against AIDS in South Africa”

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Theodore Powers is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Iowa and Research Associate with the Human Economy Program at the University of Pretoria. His research focuses on the politics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in post-apartheid South Africa. The aim of this work is to better understand the relationship between pathogens and social change in the contemporary phase of global integration.

The South African HIV/AIDS epidemic is the world’s largest in both absolute and relative terms with 6.8 millions infections and 18.9% of the adult population living with the disease. The epidemic has produced both a complex political history and the world’s largest treatment program. The presentation will briefly review the exponential growth of the epidemic and the key milestones in reaching universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment in 2012. Finally, the challenges ahead in ending the South African epidemic will be reviewed.

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Filed under Africa, Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2016

Ron McMullen, Wednesday April 13, 2016

Picture1“Iowa, Heroin, and Afghanistan”

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This presentation will focus on the connection between U.S counter-narcotics policy, the deteriorating rule of law situation in Afghanistan, and Iowa’s surge in opioid and heroin abuse.

Ron McMullen, currently the University of Iowa’s Ambassador in Residence, served as U.S. Ambassador to the State of Eritrea.  Ron has over 30 years of diplomatic experience and has lived, worked, or traveled in 98 countries.  In Burma he worked closely with Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and pro-democracy groups. While posted in Fiji he helped prevent civil conflict after an armed takeover of parliament.  He was shot at during a riot in Sri Lanka and helped train mongooses to detect heroin.  He survived a voodoo curse in the Dominican Republic and took Hillary Clinton on a tour of South Africa’s Robben Island with Nelson Mandela.
Between foreign assignments, Ron served three years as Visiting Professor at the Military Academy at West Point, where he taught International Relations and Comparative Politics.  He was Diplomat-In-Residence at the University of Texas at Austin 2010-2012. He has authored a number of scholarly works and is a three-time recipient of the State Department’s Superior Honor Award.  In 2015 he received the University of Iowa’s Honors Program Teaching Award. A native of Northwood, Iowa and a graduate of Drake University, he earned his doctorate in political science from the University of Iowa.

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Filed under Governance Issues, Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2016, The Middle East, U.S. Foreign Policy

Hans House, Thursday April 7, 2016

HansHouse_Headshot2015“ZIKV, CHIKV, and Dengue: The Viral Gifts of the Tiger Mosquito”

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Dr. House is a Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Iowa. He attended medical school at USC, and completed a dual residency in Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine at UCLA. He also has a Diploma of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene from the London School of Tropical Medicine. He has published several articles on travel-related infections and regularly speaks about travel related diseases and emerging infectious diseases.

The Aedes species of mosquito is responsible for three of the most significant vector borne diseases to affect the Americas in the last decade. For years, this pest has spread unchallenged, bringing regular waves of epidemic Dengue Fever. The arrival of Chikungunya and now the teratogenic Zika Virus is providing a new impetus for vector control efforts.

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2016

Carol Moss, Wednesday February 3, 2016

Picture1“Dissemination of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program in the Guercif Province, Morocco: A Community Approach”

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Carol Moss is a Research Associate in the UI Department of Family Medicine and a recent graduate of the UI College of Public Health (MS, Epidemiology) with a Graduate Certificate in Global Health Studies. She is interested in alternative cervical cancer screening strategies in low resource settings, primarily in the countries of Guatemala, Cuba, and Morocco. She received a UI Global Health Studies Travel Award in 2015 to conduct work in Morocco where she has established ties over the past thirty years.

In 2010, a national program for early detection of cervical cancer in women aged 30-49 was implemented in Morocco. The program is under the auspices of the Foundation Lalla Salma, a non-governmental organization (NGO), and also encompasses a breast cancer screening component. The program initially covered five of sixteen regions of the country but was expanded to additional regions in subsequent years. The aim of the present study, conducted over a two-week period, was to both determine knowledge of the NGO and the indigenous peoples it served as well as increasing general awareness of the NGO and cervical cancer screening programs.

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Filed under Africa, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2016

Rebecca Arnold, Wednesday November 11, 2015

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 “Capacity Strengthening for Health Communication in Bangladesh”

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Rebecca Arnold is a global health professional specializing in health communication and behavior change. She works for Johns Hopkins University Center for Communication Programs and has been based in Dhaka, Bangladesh since 2012. Currently, she is the Director of BKMI, a USAID-funded project that provides capacity strengthening and technical assistance to the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare in Bangladesh. Rebecca previously led a global health consulting business, worked in Tanzania for a multi-media entertainment-education initiative and served as a community health volunteer for the Peace Corps. Ms. Arnold, a native of Rock Island, holds an MPH in Community and Behavioral Health from the University of Iowa College of Public Health.  She received her BA from Northwestern University. Ms. Arnold is in Iowa City to receive the University of Iowa’s International Impact Award.

In recent years, Arnold has directed the Bangladesh Knowledge Management Initiative (BKMI) in Dhaka, Bangladesh.  BKMI is a USAID-funded project to strengthen the capacity of the Bangladesh Ministry of Health and Family Welfare as it attempts to develop a national communication framework for health, population, and nutrition, which is currently absent in Bangladesh.  As part of this effort, she is developing digital resources (eHealth) for community-based, non-clinical field health workers to use in counseling at the household level.

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Filed under Fall 2015, Health & Medicine, Past Events

Mariola Espinosa, Wednesday September 2, 2015

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“Cuba, US, and Public Health: A History of Strained Relations”

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As tensions between the United States and Cuba begin fitfully to subside, a better understanding of the sources of the strained relationship between the two countries can help illuminate potential stumbling blocks to further progress.  One often-overlooked point of contention over the past 150 years has been public health.  U.S. concern over disease on the island was an important cause of the Spanish-American War, and efforts to fight disease were a much-resented aspect of the U.S. domination of Cuba afterwards.  The consequent development of Cuban capabilities in medicine and health, in turn, played a crucial role in Cuban foreign policy after the Revolution, not least as a means of discrediting the U.S. government.

Mariola Espinosa, Associate Professor, History, is a historian of medicine and public health in the Caribbean.  Her 2009 book,“Epidemic Invasions: Yellow Fever and the Limits of Cuban Independence, 1878-1930”,  was awarded the 2007 Jack D. Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Development Award of the American Association for the History of Medicine.  In 2010 she was recognized as the 2010 Virginia and Derrick Sherman Emerging Scholar.  She is currently working on a book project that looks into medical understandings of fever in the British, French, Spanish, and U.S. Caribbean empires.

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Filed under Fall 2015, Health & Medicine, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy

Margaret Carrel, Wednesday, May 6, 2015

3d1b4056-3f91-4123-bdce-322dff752817“Hungry Planet: Threatened Geographies Of Food”

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In 2015, 13.1% of people on Earth are undernourished and at risk of starvation. While governments compete for diminishing oil, water, and other resources to fuel their economics, at least 20,000 children a day die from hunger. What we choose to put on our plates is the direct outcome of a complex set of interactions, from the individual scale to the global, that have serious implications for both population and environmental health.  With forces such as drought, global climate change, infectious disease and income inequality posing imminent threats, how will food production be affected in the coming decades? Professor Margaret Carrel presents the theme “Hungry Planet: Threatened Geographies of Food.”

 Margaret Carrel serves as Assistant Professor in the UI Department of Geography. She received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.   Her research interests include the geography of infectious disease, landscape genetics and disease ecology. The focus of her research is how to understand how complex interactions between people and environments result in disease outcomes and the evolution of human pathogens. She has also conducted disease research in rural Bangladesh on the correlation of flood control measures and the prevention of diarrheal events. Most recently she has begun research in Iowa surrounding residential proximity to swine and its relation to MRSA infections.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2015

Renu Pariyadath, Thursday, March 5, 2015

 Renu New“Bhopal (1984 – ?): The 30th Anniversary and the Ongoing Disaster”

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Thirty years after Methyl IsoCyanate (MIC) leaked from the Union Carbide (now a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Dow Chemical Company) pesticide plant in Bhopal, India, the disaster has claimed over 25,000 lives and over 150,000 people are chronically ill. Water and soil contamination from the abandoned factory have multiplied the impact of the disaster and have left women and children particularly vulnerable. The Bhopali survivors have waged a 30-year struggle for justice on a transnational scale, seeking adequate compensation, medical care, clean water and a comprehensive cleanup of the abandoned factory and its surroundings. Renu Pariyadath will discuss the disaster’s continuing health impacts in Bhopal today and the status of the transnational campaign produced in its wake.

Renu Pariyadath is a Ph.D. Candidate  in the Communication Studies Department at the University of Iowa with a minor in Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies. Renu researches migrant activism within the Indian diaspora and has been a volunteer with the international movement for justice surrounding the Bhopal gas disaster for over three years. She is interested in the barriers to and the possibilities for forging a transnational environmental and reproductive justice movement in the context of the Bhopal disaster. Renu is the Chapter and Volunteer Coordinator of the Association for India’s Development (AID-US) and former Community Outreach Coordinator for the International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal (ICJB). She got involved with the ICJB in 2012 when she visited Bhopal for her Ph.D. field research supported by the Stanley Graduate Award for International Research.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2015

Margaret Mills, Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Mills pic

“From Soviet Supremacy to Major Restructuring: Health Care Issues in Russia Today”

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Russia is going through a health care crisis.  Population decline, re-emerging infectious diseases, a growing HIV/AIDs epidemic, tobacco and alcohol-related deaths, low life expectancy and declining birth rates are plaguing the nation.  Individual attitudes toward “health” and social responses to reduced access to basic health care in Russia recently are contributing the urgent problems.  Professor Mills will provide an overview of the history and on-going challenges to create a better health care system.

Margaret H. Mills is a Professor of Russian language and linguistics and the former Chair of the Department of Asian and Slavic Languages at the University of Iowa. She received her PhD from the University of Michigan and her MPH from the University of Iowa . She has devoted over 30 years to studying, consulting, and conducting linguistic and public health field work research in the Soviet Union and Russia. This work has resulted in over 40 trips to the Soviet Union and Russia since 1977, including escorting delegations of UI Family Medicine and Family Dentistry faculty to medical sites and conferences in Moscow. Among her health-related work, she is the co-editor and chapter author of a monograph (with Vicki Hesli) entitled Medical Issues and Health Care Reform in Russia (1999).

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Filed under Europe, Fall 2014, Governance Issues, Health & Medicine

Ron Reed, Wednesday, November 19, 2014

RonReed4x6

An International Comparison of Health Care Systems: Coverage, Cost & Quality

The US health care system in the most expensive in the world.  But does the quality of the care outweigh the cost?  Thousands of Americans go bankrupt each year due to medical bills, and childbirth in the US costs twice as much as any other country.  Ron Reed will look at the cost and quality of international health care systems in comparison to the US.

Ronald R. Reed has been the President and CEO of Mercy Iowa City since 1995.  Mr. Reed received a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and a Masters degree in Public Health from the University of Pittsburgh.  He is a recipient of the Outstanding Leadership Award from the Hospital Association of Pennsylvania and was named a University Scholar for his academic achievements at the University of Pittsburgh.  He currently serves on the Boards of the Iowa Hospital Association, the Iowa Healthcare Collaborative, and Health Enterprises.  Moreover, he serves as Past Chair of the Health Enterprises Cooperative Board and Past Chair of the Chamber’s CEO Roundtable.

 

 

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Filed under Fall 2014, Health & Medicine, Past Events

Hans House, Wednesday, November 5, 2014

ImageHansHouse “Ebola: Lessons From the Hot Zone”

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Ebola has captured attention as a major health crisis.  From West Africa to the United Kingdom and United States, the spread of Ebola has become  increasingly pervasive.  Hans House will examine the current Ebola outbreak in and around Guinea and review the history of Ebola as a disease.    Understanding how Ebola emerged as a new disease gives us insight into how new diseases have developed and will continue to appear over time.

Dr. House is a professor and head of the educational programs in the department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Iowa.  Dr. House attended  medical school at University of Southern California and completed a dual residency in Emergency Medicine and Internal Medical at University of California,  Los Angeles.  He also studied at the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.  He studies new and emerging infections and regularly lectures on travel  related and emerging infectious diseases.

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Filed under Fall 2014, Health & Medicine, Past Events

Emily Wentzell, April 9, 2014

Wentzell photo“Viagra, Aging, and Changing Masculinities in Mexico” 

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Since the advent of Viagra in 1998, decreasing erectile function has become known and treated as “erectile dysfunction” (ED). However, individual men’s understandings of ED, and its subsequent treatment, are diverse and reflect their individual social contexts.   This talk presents findings from research with 250 older, working class men in Cuernavaca, Mexico.  Despite local stereotypes of men as sex-obsessed “machos,” most study participants rejected ED drugs and did not understand erectile function change as a medical problem.  Instead, they collaborated with wives and physicians to frame this change as a physical prompt to stop acting out youthful forms of manhood centered around penetrative, often extramarital sex, and to shift to what they saw as a more mature form of masculinity focused on the home and emotional bonds with family.

Emily Wentzell is an Assistant Professor in the University of Iowa Department of Anthropology. Her research combines approaches from medical anthropology, gender studies and science and technology studies to examine sexual health interventions’ gendered social consequences in Mexico and the US.  She is the author of Maturing Masculinities: Aging, Chronic Illness and Viagra in Mexico (Duke University Press), and is currently researching the Mexican couples’ experiences of participation in longitudinal, observational HPV research.

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2014

Gregory Carmichael, March 27, 2014

carmichael pic“The Globalization of Air Pollution: Implications for Our Air, Water, and Food Quality”

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Gregory R. Carmichael, is the Karl Kammermeyer Professor of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the University of Iowa.  He is internationally known for work on international air pollution concerns. Carmichael’s studies have led to greater understanding of problems related to the long range transport of pollutants within Asia and across the Pacific. Most recently his work has focused on the role of black carbon in the atmosphere and its dual role as an air pollutant and climate warming agent.

Gregory Carmichael is a member of the scientific steering committee for the UNEP Atmospheric Brown Clouds Asia project, where he has published recent papers on the important role of black carbon in the climate system. He also serves as chair for the Scientific Advisory Group for the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmospheric Watch Urban Meteorology and Environment project (GURME-WMO), which is focused on building global capacity to improve air quality forecasts and related services.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Governance Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2014, Technology

Jose Morcuende, February 20, 2014

6642039297_79bf1ac6c9_o“The Worldwide Impacts of the Ponseti International Association”

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Each year, 200,000 children worldwide are born with clubfoot, and about 80% of these children live in impoverished countries.  Without corrective treatment, these children face not only severe lifelong physical issues but may be cast aside and regarded as useless by their societies.

The legendary and revered Ignacio Ponseti, MD, was at the University of Iowa from 1941 to 2009. He transformed the treatment of clubfoot through his invention of a non-invasive, cost-effective procedure utilizing a series of casts and manipulation.

Jose Morcuende, MD, PhD, received his degrees from Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. He arrived in Iowa City in 1991 to study with Dr. Ponseti. As President and Medical Director of the Ponseti International Association (PIA) Dr. Morcuende continues to advance the Ponseti Method worldwide.  He has visited more than 55 countries, helping to establish clinics, train personnel, and permanently improve the lives of thousands of children.

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2014

Rene Genadry, MD, February 11, 2014

Genadry pic“Reflections on the Development of a Collaborative Program in Niger”

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Dr. Rene Genadry will share the process behind his proposal to develop a collaborative relationship with the Abdo Moumouni University School of Health Sciences through the International Programs at the UI. He will review a format of cooperation in the areas of pelvic floor disorders and urinary incontinence including obstetric fistula.  The challenges and the mutual benefits in the development of such a long-term relationship will be addressed, including the status of the program and a long-term vision for the future.

Genadry is a Professor of OB/Gyn and Urology at the UI Carver School of Medicine. He is a member of the International Obstetric Fistula Working Group of the UNFPA aiming at eradicating Obstetric Fistula and has co-directed a seminar on research priorities in Obstetric Fistula at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has collaborated with the Johns Hopkins Program for International Education in Gynecology and Obstetrics, the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and the International Organization for Women and Development.  He is the co-author of a “Women’s Guide to Urinary Incontinence” published at the Johns Hopkins University Press.

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Filed under Governance Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2014

Drew Kitchen, February 6, 2014

Kitchen Pic“The Co-Evolution of Humans and Pathogens”

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Pathogens and parasites have evolved in intimate relationships with their human hosts, and have often played central roles in human population history.  Notably, human pathogens evolve with surprising rapidity, quickly exploiting novel niches introduced by shifts in human behavior or ecology.  In this talk, Drew Kitchen will present recent work that investigates the connection between pathogen/parasite evolution and the history of their human host populations. He will close with a discussion of how human parasites, such as lice, may colonize new niches introduced by shifts in human behavior, and in so doing, become unique markers of evolutionary history.

Kitchen graduated from the Johns Hopkins University in 2001 with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, after which he then obtained an M.Sc. (Biology) from the University of Oxford (Hertford College) in 2003, before receiving both an M.A. (2004) and a Ph.D. (2008) in Anthropology from the University of Florida. Before joining the University of Iowa in 2012 as an Assistant Professor in the Anthropology department, he was a postdoc in the Center of Infectious Disease Dynamics at the Penn State University. Drew’s research interests are in human evolution and pathogen evolution. His current research is focused on the molecular evolution of pathogens including the macro evolutionary patterns of pathogen emergence and divergence, and genetic studies of ancient human migrations in general and the peopling of the Americas in particular.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2014