Category Archives: Economics

Mariano Magalhães and Elisa Klewinski,Wednesday, December 6, 2017

IMG_4332“The Economic and Political Challenges Confronting Brazil ”

Dr. Mariano Magalhães is a professor of Political Science at Augustana College, where he teaches courses that focus primarily on the consolidation and quality of democracy in the developing world, with a special emphasis on Latin America. Dr. Magalhães was a Fulbright Scholar at the Universidade de Brasília in 2011 and currently serves as Director of the Brazil Term Study Abroad Program, Director of the Africana Studies Program, and Chair of the Division of Social Sciences at Augustana College. He has published articles on the impact of decentralization on democracy in Brazil, the role of the Brazilian armed forces in post-1985 Brazil and this past summer conducted research on the relationship between feminist civil society and the state in Brazil.

Elisa Klewinski is a junior Political Science and Environmental Studies double major at Augustana College. She recently spent five and a half weeks in Rio de Janeiro and Salvador studying the nature of democracy and the state of economic development in Brazil.

In the span of roughly a generation Brazilian democracy has gone from being labeled as “feckless” and the economy as “drunk” in the early 1990s to being hailed for its innovative social policies, emerging economy and robust democracy in the first part of the 21st century (under the guidance primarily of former President Lula da Silva) and, in the last three years, back to economic paralysis and political crisis, amid the worst corruption scandal in the history of the country. The goal of our presentation is to show that these characterizations tend to exaggerate both the bad and the good of Brazil during these periods. Instead, by most accounts, Brazil is now an established democracy but with flaws. The most recent crisis has deeply divided the nation, leading many Brazilians to question the legitimacy of not only the current government but of the democratic project itself. The impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff in 2016 and the greed of so many politicians caught up in the Lava-Jato corruption scandal has led to high levels of popular disenchantment and dissatisfaction of the political elite. Despite this, democracy shows signs of significant growth, with the development of strong institutions of accountability, especially the judiciary and the media, a vibrant civil society and the following of democratic political rules by key actors.

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Filed under Economics, Fall 2017, Past Events, Uncategorized

Don Letendre, Wednesday February 1, 2017

picture1“The Global Impact of Drugs”

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From small communities to corporate enterprises, drugs and their impact are reshaping the healthcare and economic landscape, making the educational journey of today’s pharmacists highly demanding and competitive. Peoples’ perceptions about drugs and their impact on society are limited to what they see and read. During this lecture Dr. Letendre will shed light on some of the new and fascinating ways in which drugs are impacting society, positively and negatively, including astonishing new medications that are helping to treat and cure maladies that were once thought untreatable and incurable.

Donald E. Letendre is Dean and Professor, University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. Following completion of his Doctorate in Pharmacy and clinical residency at the University of Kentucky, he served as Assistant Director and Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas Medical Center; spent nearly two decades on the staff of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) serving, for much of that time, as Director of Accreditation Services; and, was Dean and Professor at the University of Rhode Island and Executive Secretary of the Rhode Island State Crime Laboratory Commission immediately prior to his responsibilities at Iowa. As a clinical practitioner, educator, association staff member, and now academic administrator, Dean Letendre has been privileged to serve countless students and postgraduate residents throughout his career, and has actively participated in the development and implementation of standards that have helped shape pharmacy practice and residency and technician training programs worldwide.

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Filed under Economics, Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2017, U.S. Foreign Policy

David Wu, Wednesday January 25th, 2017

dave-wu-photo“The Evolving Global Commercial Aircraft Industry; Emerging Competitors from China and Russia”

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This presentation will provide an overview of the current global commercial aircraft industry and potential future evolution. The current Mainline aircraft market is dominated by Boeing and Airbus, while Bombardier and Embraer dominate in the Regional category. The lecture will cover new entrants such as Japan’s Mitsubishi Aircraft, China’s Commercial Aircraft Corporation, and Russia’s United Aircraft Corporation. A future scenario on the potential challenge posed by a combined effort from China and Russia will also be discussed.

David Wu is an adjunct lecturer at the University of Iowa with a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Toronto. With an extensive background in aerospace material design, he has held management positions at engineering firms for the last three decades. He received his MBA from Arizona State University in 1997 and has expertise in strategic development, product marketing, and international
business.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Economics, Past Events, Russia and Central Asia, Spring 2017

Mandela Washington Fellows: Tochukwu Ikpegbu, Ameth Diallo, and Stephennette Taylor, Tuesday July 12, 2016

mandela washington fellowship“China’s Emerging Influence in Africa”

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The U.S. State Department’s Mandela Washington Fellowship, started in 2014
as part of the Young African Leaders Initiative created by President Obama, empowers young people from Sub-Saharan Africa through academic coursework, leadership training, and networking. This year the Fellowship is providing 1,000 young ambassadors with the opportunity to hone their skills at U.S. higher education institutions. The Iowa delegation of Fellows will spend six weeks in Iowa taking entrepreneurial classes and touring the state.

speaker 1Tochukwu Ikpegbu is a mechanical/production engineer from Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka with over seven years experience in pork production. He has won two national awards and hopes to apply his experience into growing local businesses to reduce youth unemployment.

speaker 2Ameth Diallo is a PhD student in African and Comparative Literature at Université Gaston Berger. In 2014 he ventured into an agricultural-based project in the Senegalese River Valley which earned him the Jeunes Agriculteurs prize and a grant from the US Agency for International Development. Diallo is currently working on a project he hopes to implement in his home village of Koalack.

speaker 3Stephennette Taylor holds a Master of Business Administration in Accounting and a postgraduate diploma in Procurement Management. Taylor has several years experience as a manager at New World Finance and envisions establishing a microfinance bank to support agricultural products and rural emerging markets.

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Filed under Africa, China & East Asia, Economics, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Summer 2016

Jeffrey Ding, Tuesday May 3, 2016

Headshot - Jeffrey“An Interest Group with Chinese Characteristics—The Role of National Oil Companies in the South China Sea”

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Jeffrey Ding was born in Shanghai, China and raised in Iowa City since age three. Jeffrey is a UI Senior majoring in Political Science, Economics and Chinese. Jeffrey is the recipient of several prestigious academic awards including the Truman and Udall Scholarships, a Boren Scholar, and this fall he will begin two years as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University.

Oftentimes, when American observers view Chinese foreign policy, the message from Beijing is interpreted as homogeneous – in line with a party – state that closes off channels for dissent. In fact, multiple interests multiply along increasing globalization, and more and more interest groups are influencing China’s foreign policy decisions. One of these powerful groups is composed of the powerful state-owned oil companies. This presentation will shed light how these companies play a role in the escalation of the South China Sea disputes.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Economics, Governance Issues, Past Events, Spring 2016

Anne Villamil, Tuesday August 25, 2015

Picture1

“Implications of the Conflict between Greece & the EU”

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Greece’s financial woes dominate headlines across the globe, with images of angry citizens and protests across the Internet. Greece has requested a third bail out from the European Union and its creditors. How did Greece get to be in this crisis? What steps can the Greek people and state take to move forward? What steps will the European Union take following this chaos? What lessons about economic policy can we learn from this financial misfortune? These questions and others from the audience will be answered by Professor Villamil.

Anne Villamil is a Professor of Economics & Finance and a Henry B. Tippie Research Fellow at the University of Iowa. She earned her B.A. at the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota. Her research focuses on financial contracts, with emphasis on firm finance, bankruptcy and enforcement, and the quantitative effects of institutions and policies on financial markets and development. She holds recent grants from the NSF, NCSA, and the Kauffman Foundation. Villamil has been a research scholar at the IMF, the Institute for Advanced Studies in Austria, the National University of Singapore, University of Paris 1-Pantheon-Sorbonne, the Hallsworth Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester, and the Peter Moores Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. She is the Editor of the Annals of Finance, and an Associate Editor at Economic Theory and the Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance.

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Filed under Economics, Europe, Fall 2015, Past Events

Ron McMullen, Wednesday, December 3, 2014

McMullan, Ron

 “Elephants, Ivory & Yao Ming”

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Africa’s remaining elephants are being machine-gunned so China’s burgeoning middle class can buy ivory knick-knacks for their living rooms.  Can 7’6” former center of the Houston Rockets, Yao Ming, save the day? Ambassador McMullen will explore the fate of Africa’s elephants in the hands of a former NBA star.

McMullen, currently a Visiting Associate Professor at the University of Iowa, served as U.S. Ambassador to the State of Eritrea.  Ron has over 30 years of diplomatic experience and has lived, worked, or traveled in 91 countries.  In Burma he worked closely with Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and pro-democracy groups.  While posted in Fiji he helped prevent civil conflict after an armed takeover of parliament.   He was shot at during a riot in Sri Lanka and helped train mongooses to detect heroin.  He survived a voodoo curse in the Dominican Republic and took Hillary Clinton on a tour of South Africa’s Robben Island with Nelson Mandela.  Between foreign assignments, Ron served for three years as Visiting Professor at the Military Academy at West Point, where he taught International Relations and Comparative Politics.  He was Diplomat-In-Residence at the University of Texas at Austin 2010-2012.  He has authored many scholarly works and is a three-time recipient of the State Department’s Superior Honor Award.  A native of Northwood, Iowa, he earned his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Iowa.

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Filed under Africa, China & East Asia, Economics, Fall 2014

Maureen “Micki” McCue, December 5, 2013

mccue_maureen_4x5“Health and Human Rights in the Shadow of Fukushima”

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The triple disaster at Fukushima did not have a simple beginning, middle or end.  Tensions, misunderstandings, and lack of consensus between political, economic, scientific, and social interests began long before the disaster and continue unabated almost 3 years later.  Populations in, around and far beyond Fukushima continue to struggle for resolution and understanding balanced between belief and fear, suspicion and science.  Using the frame of health and human rights, this presentation explores the boundaries of medical science and social responsibility as circumstances unfold for Japan and the world within an increasingly unstable climate and degraded global environment.

Dr. Maureen McCue is a founding member, faculty, and former director of the University of Iowa Global Health Studies Program as well as a founding board member for the UI Center for Human Rights.  As Adjunct Clinical Professor in the Colleges of Public Health and of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Dr. McCue has been teaching Health and Human Rights courses since 1997.  Before coming to Iowa, she worked as a primary care provider with marginalized communities and has worked for a local women’s clinic for the last 16 years.  She has coordinated the Iowa Chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility for the last 10 years.  Dr. McCue has traveled, consulted, and worked extensively as a peace maker, researcher, and physician.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Economics, Environmental Issues, Fall 2013, Governance Issues, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events

Tyler Priest, November 20, 2013

Ty Priest“40th Anniversary:The 1973 Oil Embargo and its Aftermath”

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This year marks the 40th anniversary of the 1973 oil crisis or “shock.” The shock is mainly remembered for the Arab oil embargo imposed in the fall of 1973, but there were underlying structural problems within the oil industry that turned the embargo into a full-blown crisis. The inability of U.S. production to compensate for supply shortages, combined with the loss of the major oil companies’ control over Middle East production and prices, created a shock that reshaped the international petroleum industry and world affairs in ways that still reverberate today.

Tyler Priest (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison) is Associate Professor of History and Geography, University of Iowa.  He is a specialist in the history of oil and energy.  He is the author of The Offshore Imperative: Shell Oil’s Search for Petroleum in Postwar America (Texas A&M Press: 2007) and is working on a new book titled, Deepwater Horizons: Managing Offshore Oil and Gas in the United States.  In 2010-2011, he served as a senior policy analyst for the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling.

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Filed under Economics, Environmental Issues, Fall 2013, Governance Issues, Past Events, The Middle East, U.S. Foreign Policy

Prof. Fred Solt, September 26, 2013

Fred Solt“Economic Inequality and Democratic Performance Around the World”

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Over the past three decades, economic inequality has risen in many democracies around the world.  As the rich grow richer relative to everyone else, do they also grow relatively more powerful, undermining democracy’s promise of political equality?  Patterns of political attitudes, behavior, and policymaking in democracies around the world support the answer that yes, political equality does depend on economic equality.

Frederick Solt is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa.  His primary research interests are in comparative politics and focus on the consequences of economic inequality for political attitudes and behavior. His work on this topic has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the British Journal of Political Science, and other journals. To facilitate this research, he created and maintains the Standardized World Income Inequality Database (SWIID), which provides the most comparable data available on income inequality for countries around the world over the past half-century.

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Filed under Business, Economics, Fall 2013, Governance Issues, Past Events

Chuck Peters, September 17, 2013

Bio Photo 2009“Transforming a Local Business with Global Connections”

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In an ever-globalizing world, maintaining a small, local business is increasingly difficult. Companies need to expand and use their global connections while remaining grounded within their communities. Chuck Peters, CEO and President of the Gazette Company, will discuss the variety of international initiatives the Gazette Company currently has underway.

Chuck is the President and Chief Executive Officer of The Gazette Company, a company owned by a trust for the benefit of the employees (ESOP), and doing business as Iowa SourceMedia Group, consisting of The Gazette newspaper, KCRG – TV9, an ABC affiliate, Hoopla, and numerous online sites; Fusionfarm, a digital services agency and ColorWeb Printers.  He is on the board of directors of the Newspaper Association of America.

A lawyer by training, Chuck graduated from the University of Iowa College of Law. He spent a decade in the appliance business, five years as President of Amana Refrigeration and until 1998 as Vice President – Administration of Maytag.  Between appliance assignments, he was the CEO of Breakthrough, an Iowa City start-up software and consulting company engaged in developing effective early literacy programs for school systems.

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Filed under Business, Economics, Fall 2013, Past Events, Technology

Prof. Gary Gleason, August 22, 2013

gleason“An Iowa Solution to Malnutrition in Malawi, Zambia, and Rwanda”

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Children in Malawi, Zambia, and Rwanda are suffering from malnutrition. As a major agricultural state, Iowa has the resources, techniques, and experience to assist in such countries. The talk will focus on a range of communication supports for “Scaling Up Nutrition” (or SUN), an initiative started in 2009. SUN programs have particular emphasis on the policies of national nutrition strategies in countries in Africa, supporting the “1000 Days” concept to prevent childhood stunting.

Professor Gleason received his Ph.D. in Mass Communication here at Iowa. While here he focused on Communication for International Development, an emphasis that later evolved into a graduate program. Currently, he is Director of Communication for the International Nutrition Foundation, and is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, near Boston, where he lives with his wife.

Professor Gleason joined UNICEF after graduating and began a career as a UN staff member and consultant. His work assignments took him to over 30 countries in Africa, the Middle-East, Eastern Europe, Central Asia and the Far East. Through his affiliation with the International Nutrition Foundation, since 1998 he has been a global leader in the prevention of iron deficiency anemia and universal iodization of salt. Gleason has applied his expertise in communication to a diverse range of development assistance including project design and evaluation, national policy development, design of information systems for decision-making, agriculture, child and maternal health, water, hygiene and sanitation, and primary education for HIV/AIDS.

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Filed under Economics, Environmental Issues, Fall 2013, Health & Medicine, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events

Dean Sarah Gardial, July 18, 2013

sarah_gardial headshot“Developing a Global Mindset: Successes and Opportunities at the UI Tippie College of Business”

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More than ever before, today’s business students are graduating into a global economy. In addition to the challenges of technology and the global movement of goods and services, students must also be able to work – sometimes virtually, sometimes face-to-face – with persons from a variety of cultures, languages, and political/economic systems. What are the skills required for business students to be successful in such an environment? Learn how the UI Tippie College of Business is addressing these needs, both now and in the future.

Dean Gardial, a native of Hot Springs, Ark., earned a BS in Business Administration and an MBA in Marketing from the University of Arkansas. She earned a PhD in Marketing from the University of Houston.

Gardial Bike cropped

Dean Gardial is trying to instill in her students a global mindset. Twenty-two percent of the UI Tippie College of Business undergraduate students are from non-U.S. countries, with most from China, Malaysia, and India. Such international students clearly benefit from education and immersion in U.S. culture, but she is trying to help U.S. students benefit from international students as well. Dean Sarah Gardial enjoys her free time. She is a huge rock ‘n’ roll fan; some of her favorite singers are Joan Jett and Stevie Nicks. She was once lead singer of a rock ‘n’ roll outfit, Air Supply Chain.  She also loves to explore new parts of the country on her motorcycle.

Check out some additional information on Dean Gardial:

“A Closer Look: Sarah Gardial”

“Tippie Appoints First Female Dean”

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Filed under Business, China & East Asia, Economics, Education, Past Events, Summer 2013

Prof. Jeongsik Ko, June 20, 2013

Ko Photo“The Implications of North Korea’s Strengthening Economic Ties with China”

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North Korea is a mysterious, occasionally threatening country to the outside world, to its neighbors and even to its primary economic supporter, China. The extent of China’s support for North Korea and the cause of North Korea’s dependence on China will be reviewed. The effectiveness of economic sanctions led by South Korea, Japan and the United States for resolving the nuclear threats will be discussed.

Fittingly, in this photo, Professor Jeongsik Ko is shown near the border between South and North Korea. In the course of his academic and trade studies he has visited North Korea several times. Professor Ko is a veteran negotiator for the singular Kaesong Industrial Zone, a North Korean border city where more than 125 South Korean companies employ over 55,000 North Koreans.

In addition to his faculty position at Pai Chai University in Daejeon, South Korea, Dr. Ko is currently a Visiting Scholar at the University of Iowa’s Center for Asia and Pacific Studies. He has enjoyed serving in a number of economic and trade associations within China and Korea and previously served within the Korean Ministry of Unification.  He has published several books and papers on the Chinese economic system, foreign investment and commerce’s role to resolve conflicts. He first came to Iowa twenty-two years ago and we are pleased to welcome his presentation.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Economics, Past Events, Summer 2013

Dr. Viraj P. Thacker, March 14, 2013

“Perspectives on the Myth of Prosperity”

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Globalization creates some major imbalances in a world system increasingly based on market economics. The economic state of Third World nations remains extremely unsatisfactory, with very little “trickling down” to the poor majority. One third of the world ‘s poor are only getting poorer. Dr. Thacker will address globalization and international relations as they relate to North-South economic imbalances, and will also t ouch upon social justice perspectives that are specifically affecting Nepal .

Dr. Thacker has served as the International Executive Director for Manushi Sustainable Development, an international NGO in Katmandu, Nepal for the past 15 years. Dr. Thacker, a graduate of Luther College and Iowa State University, received his PhD in International Relations from the University of Adelaide in Australia. He has published three books, the most recent being “Perspectives on the Myth of Prosperity”, which deals with the severe economic disparities between the Northern and Southern nations and was introduced at the “World Canvas” at the University of Iowa.

 

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Filed under Economics, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2013

Former Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel, November 14, 2012

“The Eurozone Debt Crisis”

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The current euro zone debt crisis centers on Germany and is an existential crisis about European Union political integration. Chancellor Angela Merkel explained that “if the Euro falls, Europe falls.” She described the challenge as “the most difficult since the Second World War.”  The Eurocrisis is reminiscent of two European conflagrations lasting three decades, the Thirty Years War (1618-1648) and the two twentieth-century World Wars (1914-1945).

Over the past two decades, a united Germany has accepted its EU integration responsibility to move toward a European Monetary Union, to introduce the euro, and now to resolve the current Euro crisis.  There is little doubt that Germany is obligated to support EU integration: constitutionally, historically, and morally.

In a recent article published in the German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung, Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel discussed the Eurozone debt crisis and its importance to the global economy, and he will share his views on the crisis for this ICFRC program.

Ambassador Bindenagel is an expert on German politico-military history and policy.  He is a former U.S. Ambassador and career diplomat who served in East, West and united Germanys during the end of the Cold War. He had a part in the reunification of Germany, the Balkan Wars, debates on North Atlantic Treaty Organization security policy and expanded membership, and in German national security from 1972 to 2002. He was appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1999 as U.S. Ambassador and Special Envoy for Holocaust Issues.  He was a consultant and interviewed as an eyewitness for “The Wall: A Country United”. A Houston PBS documentary about the fall of the Berlin Wall, produced, written and directed by Eric Stange.

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Filed under Economics, Europe, Fall 2012, Governance Issues, Past Events

John Seager, November 2, 2012

“World Population – Seven Billion and Growing Rapidly”

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Rapid population growth impacts all areas of human life and the environment. Serious social problems are also exacerbated by rapid population growth. It is very difficult—if not impossible—for families to climb out of poverty when couples begin childbearing early and have more children than they can afford to educate. And to complete the cycle, less educated children tend to grow up and have their own large families. Global population grows by approximately 80 million people annually. What can we do? This talk will give an overview of root causes, impacts and ways to meet the population challenge and will illustrate the intersections between population stabilization, the environment, social equity, and women’s empowerment.

 John Seager is the President and CEO of Population Connection, the preeminent grassroots group for population education and advocacy. He joined the organization for the first time in 1996 and previously served with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton Administration. Seager was also Chief of Staff for former U.S. Representative Peter H. Kostmayer (D-PA), a senior member of the House of Foreign Affairs and Interior committees.

 A graduate of Trinity College (CT) with a B.A. in Political Science, John travels throughout the country making presentations on global population growth. John has written articles on population stabilization, including its connections to poverty, its future outcomes, and the concern about population decline in some highly developed nations. He has lectured and presented at the University of Chicago, Smith College, and the University of California, San Diego, and many others.

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Filed under Economics, Environmental Issues, Fall 2012, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events

Prof. Jeff Hoover, October 29, 2012

“Conflict Minerals and the Ongoing Agony of Eastern Congo”

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The Democratic Republic of the Congo has a reputation as a failed state and a bottomless quagmire. There are many Congolese realities, however, separated by geographical factors, and some parts of the Congo are doing quite well at the current time. Professor Hoover will be talking about Eastern Congo and the very real tragedy of the areas neighboring the west branch of the Rift Valley. They owe as much or more to the technology of mining coltan, gold, and other minerals of this area than to Congolese capacities to form an effective administration in the area.

Dr. J. Jeffrey Hoover earned his Ph.D. in African History from Yale University, specializing  in Tribal Structures in the Congo. His doctoral research was on the origins of the Lunda political system during the 17th through 19th centuries, doing pioneer work with historical linguistics in investigating how a multilingual commonwealth could spread over a thousand miles of African savanna without modern transportation and communications. He also has a degree from Luther College, in Iowa.

He and his wife Ellen, also a Yale Ph.D. in African History, have taught and raised a family in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1979. He is a senior professor in the Department of History at the University of Lubumbashi, and the Director of University Libraries. He also teaches at Katanga Methodist University at Mulungwishi and has served as dean and library head there. In 1985-1991 he served as director of a medical infrastructure rehabilitation project funded by USAID in western Katanga, and has been a consultant to various international organizations and companies. The Hoovers are employed by the General Board of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church.

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Filed under Economics, Environmental Issues, Fall 2012, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events

German Zarate-Durier, October 8, 2012

“Free Trade Agreements’ Impact on Colombians”

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German is an International Peacemaker from Colombia and a peace and justice activist.  His efforts focus on the promotion of human rights. He works with social justice organizations, especially those devoted to victims of violence, and with the Presbyterian Accompaniment Program for Peace. Based on his experience in community organizing, he believes profoundly in peace based on justice to resolve political, social and agrarian economic conflicts.

He will focus on resolution of conflict rooted in the physical displacement, abuse, and economic inequities imposed upon Colombians by multinational companies in subversion of the Free Trade Agreement; the violence situation within Colombia and new changes for hope and peace; participative citizenship for peaceful change; and justice and Christian faith in the Colombian context.

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Filed under Economics, Fall 2012, Governance Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events

Greg Churchill, October 17. 2012

“Ten Realities of Doing Business Globally”

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Gregory S. Churchill is the Executive Vice President of Rockwell Collins International and Service Solutions, an organization that combines all of Rockwell Collins’ International and Service operations into one entity. He will be sharing a high level overview of some basic, but very real, truths about doing business in the international marketplace based on experiences that he has developed over many years of serving a broad range of customers. Churchill is responsible for approximately $2B in orders capture, $900M in sales and 3,000 people in approximately 30 countries.

Before being appointed to lead this organization in February 2010, Churchill was named Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Government Systems for Rockwell Collins.

Churchill, a 30 plus year veteran of the company, also served as Vice President and General Manager of Business and Regional Systems since June 2001. He held several business development and program management positions before being named Vice President of Business Development for Government Systems in February 2000.

A native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Churchill earned a Bachelor of Science degree in industrial administration from Iowa State University. Churchill is also a member of the Engineering College Industrial Advisory Council and the Business College Advisory Council for Iowa State University and serves on the board of directors for the Cedar Rapids Baseball Club.

Churchill is a member of the following organizations:  American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Airlift Tanker Association, Army Aviation Association of America, Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association, American Helicopter Society, Association of the U.S. Army, Navy League and the National Defense Industrial Association.

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Filed under Business, Economics, Fall 2012, Past Events, Technology