Mercedes Niño-Murcia, Wednesday, December 12th, 2018

mercedes“How Mass Migration Is Changing Our Understanding of Language and Bilingualism”

With people, languages, and cultures in motion everywhere, sociolinguists are learning to take mobility rather than territorial language community as its baseline assumption. Services, information, networking and communication run teeming across all frontiers. Nothing stays put. Language-oriented social scientists are embracing a new frame known as the “mobility turn.” We distinguish three interacting regimes of mobility: international refugee movement, international tourism or life-style travel, and labor flows. They morph into one another in patterns that aren’t captured by our habitual terms migration and diaspora.
As identities are renegotiated every element of dialogue among groups becomes more fluid. Linguists are working out how mobility reconfigures words, meanings, and multilingual practices down to details of daily neighborhood life. I will illustrate some of the consequences for legal interactions in our Midwestern communities.
Mercedes Niño-Murcia is Professor of Hispanic Linguistics in the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Iowa. She is a sociolinguist currently focusing on language ideologies as they affect bilingual communities in Latin America and the United States. She is also interested in language policy and in how sociolinguistic inequalities affect indigenous and/or migrant groups in both rural and urban settings. Her past work includes the ethnographic study of writers, archives, and vernacular literacies in Peru (The Lettered Mountain, Duke University Press, 2011, with Frank Salomon). In a comparative vein she studies histories of writing and debates about spelling in various languages worldwide. Her current research deals with language, migration, and hierarchies of class and among Spanish-speaking immigrants in the US.

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Don Gurnett, Thursday, December 6th, 2018

gurnett-080616-1-tj-05_0“The Search for Life in the Solar System and Beyond”

Don Gurnett started his science career by working on spacecraft electronics design as a student employee in The University of Iowa Physics Department in 1959. After completing his B.S. in Electrical Engineering at Iowa, he transferred to physics, where he received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1963 and 1965. He spent one year, from 1964 to 1965, as a NASA Trainee at Stanford University, and was appointed Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa in 1965 with subsequent promotions to Associate Professor and to Professor in 1968 and 1972. He regularly teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in physics and astronomy. Among the awards he has attained, he received the M. L. Huit Faculty Award for outstanding service and dedication to students at the University of Iowa in 1990 and the Iowa Board of Regents Award for Faculty Excellence in 1994.
Don specializes in the study of space plasma physics and has participated in over 40 spacecraft projects, most notably the Voyager 1 and 2 flights to the outer planets, the Galileo mission to Jupiter, and the Cassini mission to Saturn. He is the author/co-author of over 650 scientific publications, primarily in the area of magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research. Don has received numerous awards for his research. In 1998 he was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and in 2004 he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

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Sunny Ho, Wednesday, November 28th, 2018

“A Multicultural Perspective to See Mental Health: Theories and Applications”

Ho_professional picSunny Ho is a fourth year Ph.D candidate in Counseling Psychology Program. His research interests are social justice issues and multiculturalism in mental health settings, such as race/racism, class/classism, etc. In addition, he is interested in studying barriers and challenges Asian international individuals encounter in terms of seeking mental health services. He is currently working on his dissertation about Chinese indigenous healing methods. He is passionate about intergroup dialogue and social activism work for underrepresented students on UI campus.
YUNKYOUNG-GARRISON.jpgYunkyoung (Yun) Garrison is a Ph.D. candidate in Counseling Psychology at the University of Iowa under the mentorship of William Ming Liu, Ph.D. Yun moved to Iowa from South Korea in 2013. Her research looks at the dynamics of social class privilege and classism in the US and international communities as well as multicultural and vocational issues among international students, immigrants, and children of immigrants. Yun has gained clinical experiences with diverse clienteles, including children/adolescents at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC), students at the University Counseling Service (UCS) at the University of Iowa and Student Health and Counseling Services (SHACS) at Grinnell College, students/community members in Women’s Resource and Action Center (WRAC), and middle school students in rural communities through career programing (Project HOPE).
Rosaline-web.jpgRosaline Lin is a third year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology Program. Her research interests are multicultural issues in mental health settings and career development of high-achieving students with disabilities. She is also interested in studying the function of creative arts in career and psychological interventions. Rosaline is passionate about working with underrepresented students on and off campus and supporting individuals in building strengths to cope with adversities in life.

 

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Chris Rossi, Wednesday, November 14th, 2018

rossi photo“The Migingo Dispute between Uganda and Kenya: What the world’s tiniest island tells us about international law and relations.” 

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Christopher Rossi directs Humanities Iowa and is an adjunct faculty member at the Iowa Law College. He has a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and law degrees from the University of London and the University of Iowa. He worked on deterrence issues for the Arms Control Association, a division of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and on verification issues at the UN International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria. He has taught at American University, UNI, the Mongolian Diplomatic Academy, and Pusan National University.

He served on the White House National Security Council as director of human rights and humanitarian affairs. He has published articles on the law of war, legal history, international courts and criminal tribunals, polar affairs, Latin America, and on the law of the sea. He has co-edited two books on international affairs and has authored three books, the latest titled Sovereignty and Territorial Temptation (Cambridge University Press, 2017). He has also edited a chapbook on the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition, which was distributed to 20,000 5th grade students of Iowa history, and a documentary collection of Iowa photographs by the American master, David Plowden. His current research interest is on Whiggish International Law: The Monroe Doctrine, Elihu Root, and International Law in the Americas.

Migingo is a small island in the eastern waters of Africa’s Lake Victoria. It is half the size of the Hawkeye football field. For as long as anyone can remember, it was an uninhabited pinprick that happens to straddle the water boundary between Uganda and Kenya. Recent changes in the Lake Victoria’s water table have turned the island into a perfect waystation for hunting the much-desired Nile perch. This newly discovered value of the islet has turned it into a dangerous flashpoint in the deteriorating relations between Uganda and Kenya. Who owns this island? The answer presents unsettling questions about the history of international law, colonialism, genocide, and the future of the International Criminal Court in Africa.

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Filed under Africa, Fall 2018, Governance Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized

Monica Gordillo, Wednesday, November 7, 2018

monicag“Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin America” 

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Corporate social responsibility is an increasingly important and visible topic in the business world as evidenced by the many corporations that are adopting social responsibility actions into their business practices. One reason for this social developments is that companies have long been associating sustainability of business models with socially responsible practices. However, social responsibility also has limitations and difficulties for firms, which present important questions. What are the benefits and costs associated with implementing corporate social responsibilities? What are companies doing to embrace social responsibility in Mexico, Chile, Puerto Rico, Brazil, and Colombia?

Monica Gordillo is a Lecturer In Management and International Management, Iowa State University in Ames. Monica received her B.A. in Business Administration, Summa Cum Laude, from University of San Francisco de Quito Ecuador in 1992. She received a Master of Philosophy in International Business from Cambridge University in 1996, and a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies from University of Kansas in 1998.

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Filed under Economics, Fall 2018, Past Events, Uncategorized

Joelle Adda, Tuesday, October 30th, 2018

joelle-adda-sitting-down.png“The New Challenges Facing the European Union” 

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The immigration crisis has really changed the European Union in ways that were probably not foreseeable just a few years ago, and it is generating significant political effects. One major effect has been the rise of “illiberal democracies”, and more generally a redistribution of the cards in recent elections in the European Union, a redistribution that is weakening the traditional parties of the center-left or the center-right populist parties, and giving rise to populist extreme parties. The wave of asylum seekers during the past four years has contributed to the dangerous polarization of public opinion. How can the EU remain democratic, respect the rule of law and preserve the extraordinary legacy of peace and success that has characterized Europe over the past sixty years?
     Joelle Adda is an administrative judge in France. She is currently working part time in the National Court of asylum in France and is a visiting professor in the University of Iowa College of law. Until 2017, she was the president of the Administrative Court of Lille. Prior to joining this Administrative Court, she was president of the fifth chamber of the Administrative Court of Appeal of Paris.
     She graduated from the University of Paris and from the French National School of Administration (ENA). She was rapporteur and subsequently Commissaire du Gouvernement in proceedings before the Versailles administrative Tribunal (1989-1994), then rapporteur before the Court of auditors (1994-1996), rapporteur and subsequently Commissaire du Gouvernement in proceedings before the Paris Administrative Court of appeal (1996-2000 and 2002-2005), national expert to the European Commission at the Legal service (2000-2002), Legal Director at ARCEP, the French Telecommunications and Posts Regulator (2005-2009), Associate Presiding Judge of 2nd Chamber at Administrative Court of Paris (2009 2010), and Legal Director at Société du Grand Paris (2010-2013).

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Josh Schamberger, Wednesday , October 24th, 2018

Josh Schamberger_web“Bringing International Sports Competitions to Our Community; Diplomacy, Logistics, and Challenges”

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Within the past 5 years, the Iowa City/Coralville area has become a hub of international sporting events. Wrestling has been on of the biggest draws. In 2012, the U.S. Wrestling Olympic Team Trials held at Carver-Hawkeye Arena smashed the attendance record with 57,766 people in attendance. The 2016 Olympic Team Trials saw similar success setting the 2nd place attendance record. The success of the Olympic Team Trials enabled Iowa City to host the 2018 Wrestling World Cup this past April, drawing competitors and spectators from around the world. Outside of wrestling, Iowa City/ Coralville put on the UCI Cyclo-Cross World Cup every year. This international cycling competition is put on in collaboration with the same organization that puts on the Tour de France. Josh Schamberger has been at the center of it all.
          Josh has served as President/CEO of the Iowa City/Coralville Area Convention & Visitors Bureau for the past 17 years. In this capacity he oversees the destination marketing & community betterment efforts for the greater Iowa City/Coralville area. He has been recognized twice by the Upper Midwest CVB Association for Bureau Innovation, recognized every year since 2004 by the Corridor Business Journal as one of the 20 most influential corridor leaders, and by the Iowa City Press Citizen as the 2001-2010 Person of the Decade. Josh grew up in Cuba, Puerto Rico, Florida and San Diego. He has lived in Iowa since October of 1996.

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Filed under Arts & Culture, Fall 2018, Uncategorized, University of Iowa

John Norris, Thursday, October 18th, 2018

John Norris Headshot-1 _002_“Political and Policy Obstacles to Feeding the World”
John Norris has over three decades of political, policy and administrative experience at the highest levels of state and federal government on energy and agricultural issues. Prior to becoming a Partner and Co-Owner of the State Public Policy Group (SPPG) based in Des Moines, Iowa, Norris served as the Minister-Counselor for Agriculture for the United States Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome, Italy. He was appointed by President Obama in 2009 and 2012 to serve as a Commissioner on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. In 1999, Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack asked Norris to Chair the Governor’s Working Group on Electric Restructuring and Vilsack subsequently appointed Norris as Chairman of the Iowa Utilities Board (IUB).
Norris also was elected President of the Organization of Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) States and chair of the Demand Response Working Group for the MISO. He Co-chaired the FERC/NARUC Smart Grid and Emerging Issues Collaboratives, served on the Board of Directors of the National Regulatory Research Institute, was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Iowa Power Fund and served on the Advisory Council of the Iowa Energy Center.
Norris has also owned a restaurant in rural Iowa, graduated with distinction from the University of Iowa, College of Law in 1995, and worked as an adjunct professor of American Government and Constitutional Law at Simpson College where he received his undergraduate degree in political science in 1981. Norris lives in Des Moines with his wife Jackie, their three sons: Hunter, Cole & Sam; and dog, Boss.

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Alisa Ganieva, Thursday, October 11, 2018

Wonder3 _002_“Russian Artists vs. the Russian Government”

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What’s the current relationship between the Russian government and the country’s cultural figures and institutions? The case of the Russian PEN Centre illustrates a broader collapse of freedom of speech, and revisions of recent history have become normal. What aims are being pursued? And what will be the consequences of these trends?
Alisa GANIEVA Алиса Ганиева (fiction writer, essayist; Russia) is the author of four books, including the novels Жених и невеста (2015), shortlisted for the Russian Booker, and Праздничная гора (2012) shortlisted for the Yasnaya Polyana literary prize; they appeared in English as Bride and Groom (2018) and The Mountain and the Wall (2015) and have been translated into eight languages. Her story collection Салам тебе, Далгат! [Salaam, Dalgat!] won the 2009 Debut Prize, to controversy and acclaim. Ganieva was a juror for the several literary prizes including the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 2017.

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Robin W. Lovin, Thursday, October 4th, 2018.

robin-lovin-325x325“Religion and New Realities, Moscow, Kiev, and Shanghai”

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Robin W. Lovin is a Visiting Scholar in Theology at Loyola University Chicago and University Professor of Ethics emeritus at Southern Methodist University. He is the author of several books on religion and society, including Christian Faith and Public Choices: The Social Ethics of Barth, Brunner, and Bonhoeffer (Fortress Press, 1984) translated into Chinese, Reinhold Niebuhr and Christian Realism (Cambridge University Press, 1995), Christian Realism and the New Realities (Cambridge University Press, 2008), and the forthcoming An Introduction to Christian Ethics: Goals, Duties, and Virtues (Abingdon Press).
Dr. Robin W. Lovin (B.A., Northwestern University; B.D., Ph.D. Harvard University) is a Cary Maguire University Professor of Ethics. In his academic/theological history, Prof. Lovin has served as Dean of the Perkins School of Theology from 1994 until 2002 and previously held teaching positions at Emory University and the University of Chicago. He was also Dean of the Theological School at Drew University. He is an ordained minister of the United Methodist Church and is active in local and national church events. His research interests include social ethics, religion and law, and comparative religious ethics. He has served on the editorial boards of numerous scholarly journals, including the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Studies in Christian Ethics, and the Journal of Law and Religion, and he is an editor-at-large for the Christian Century.

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Dr. Oleg Timofeyev, Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

tiimofeyev.jfif“The Golden Age of Russian Guitar”

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Oleg Vitalyevich Timofeyev, is an American musicologist and musician of Russian origin, specializing in lute and Russian guitar. He is best known for his pioneering work in the discovery, promotion, interpretation, and authentic performance of the repertoire for the 19th- and 20th-century Russian seven-string guitar.
Timofeyev comes from a musical family, being the son of cellist Natalia Timofeyeva. He began his study of the classical guitar in the early 1980s under the tutelage of Kamill Frauchi, about whom he later produced a documentary film, Frautschi (Timofeyev & Gölz 2008). He holds an M.A. in Early Music Performance from the University of Southern California (1993), and a Ph.D. in Performance Practice from Duke University (1999) (Timofeyev 1999). Since 1983 he has been performing early music on authentic instruments of the plucked family (lute, guitar). In 1989 his musical interests brought him to the U.S., where he studied with Patrick O’Brien, James Tyler, and Hopkinson Smith.
Timofeyev has performed and taught widely in Europe and the United States. A recipient of numerous scholarly awards, including IREX and Fulbright fellowships, he has taught and lectured at Maimonides State Academy (Moscow), Duke University, the University of Kansas, Northwestern University, Princeton University, the University of Iowa, Grinnell College, and the Smithsonian.
  Since earning his doctorate he has worked for the revival of Russian music played with authentic technique on the seven-string guitar, often in collaboration with other artists, including the Russian Roma guitarist Sasha Kolpakov, the Kolpakov Trio (Timofeyev, Kolpakov Trio and Talisman 2005), and the American guitarist John Schneiderman (Timofeyev and Schneiderman 2006). Among the fruits of his research has been his rediscovery and recording the music of Matvej Pavlov-Azancheev (1888-1963), who was among the rare composers for the seven-string guitar in the first half of the twentieth century.

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Dr. M.R. Rajagopal, Tuesday, September 18th, 2018

HIPPOCRATIC-POSTER“Palliative Care is Everyone’s Business : Community Participation in Healthcare”

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Dr. M.R. Rajagopal, a native of India, is both a palliative care physician and an anesthesiologist. He studied palliative care at Trivandrum Medical College and anesthesiology at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. Dr. Rajagopal held the position as Professor and Head of Anesthesiology at Calicut Medical College.

Following his time there he served as a professor and Head of Pain and Palliative Medicine at the Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences. While holding this position, Rajagopal kickstarted the first university approved graduate program in India in Pain and Palliative Medicine.

Dr. Rajagopal was also key in the formation of the Pain and Palliative Care Society in 1993. A decade later he created “Pallium India”, a charitable trust that created two Palliative care centers, and established palliative care services around the country of India. A 2018 nominee for the Nobel Peace Prize, he has been referred to as the ‘father of palliative care in India’ (first by the New York Times) in honor of his significant contribution to the Indian palliative care scene. Dr. Rajagopal was awarded the ‘Padma Shri,’ one of the highest civilian honors, by the government of India in 2018 and ‘Alison Des Forges Award for Extraordinary Activism’ by Human Rights Watch in 2014.
Dr. Rajagopal was also named one of the “30 Most Influential Leaders in Hospice and Palliative Care” by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Rajagopal even has a feature length film that focuses on his life. The film Hippocratic follows the life of Dr. Rajagopal and his dream of creating a “pain free India.”

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Peter Chanthanakone,Wedensday, September 12, 2018

Peter_friendsCreating Alternative Worlds in Animation”

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Peter Chanthanakone is an award winning director and producer specializing in 3D animated short films. He has won numerous film festival awards and his works has been selected in major film festivals around the world such as Germany, France, Austria, Canada, China, Belgium, S. Korea, Pakistan, India, Australia, Italy as a retrospective at the 2013 VIEW Animation Video Festival and on a giant screen in Times Square in the NYC International Film Festival. Cumulatively, his work has been selected in over 65 international juried competitions. He is also a jury member for the prestigious Electronic Theatre for Siggraph Asia and director and producer at RiFF Animation Studio in Bangkok, Thailand.

Peter is a perennial international speaker with talks at Siggraph Asia, Seoul International Cartoon and Animation Festival, Asia Animation Forum, the International Symposium of Electronic Arts in Dubai and Hong Kong, Society of Animation Studies in Toronto, London, and Singapore, and visiting artist talks at the world’s top animation schools, Sheridan College, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, at the University of Sao Paulo and biennial workshops at the Vientianale Film Festival and National University of Laos.

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Dr. John Canady, Wednesday, September 5th, 2018

canady_john_0“Healthcare Delivery in Developing Countries”

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John Canady, a native of Jefferson, Iowa, received his Bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Grinnell College in 1980. Following graduation John enrolled in the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Dr. Canady completed two residencies, the first in Otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, was completed in 1988. He then completed a residency in Plastic Surgery at the University of Kansas.

Dr. Canady made his mark at Iowa as Professor of Plastic Surgery at UIHC, where he practice clinically, conducted research, and instructed medical students, residents, and fellows. John also served a one year term as President of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons from 2008-2009. After departing UIHC, Dr. Canady became the Medical Director for Johnson & Johnson.

Dr. Canady’s expertise has been valued by patients over the world including a current University of Iowa College Medicine student, Ethan Craig. Ethan, originally from Korea, was adopted by a family in Cedar Rapids. Ethan had a successful cleft lip and palate surgery by Dr. Canady. 

Throughout Dr. Canady’s career, he has always been deeply involved in volunteer medical services. Most notably, Dr. Canady is the Co-Founder and Medical team leader of Iowa MOST. Iowa MOST is a 501c3 group that travels to underdeveloped countries to provide life-changing surgical care to children in need of medical attention.

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Chad Hart, Wednesday, August 29 2018

Hart_2c Chad02“Iowa’s Role in Agriculture and International trade: Why Tariffs and Trade Agreements Matter”

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Chad Hart is an extension economist and associate professor of economics at Iowa State University. Chad is a native of southwest Missouri, growing up on a rural homestead near Stark City, Missouri. He received his Ph.D. in economics and statistics in 1999 from Iowa State University. His work has concentrated on crop marketing, crop insurance, international trade agreements, and bioenergy policy. Chad is also a partner in FarmRisk, an Iowa firm that develops revenue insurance products for agriculture.

Over the course of the past couple of years, there has been a lot of conversation about international trade and the benefits/costs from it. From the renegotiations of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to the volley of tariff announcements between the U.S. and China, international trade policy is in a state of flux. That uncertainty has direct and indirect impacts for the Iowa economy, as Iowa’s (and the U.S.) agriculture sector has developed to meet international needs. In this discussion, we will explore the current set of trade agreements, disputes, and organizations; examine how Iowa agriculture fits in the global economic system; and outline the benefits and costs from international trade.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Domestic Issues, Fall 2018, Governance Issues, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Over 200 ICFRC Programs now Available on iTunes and Apple Podcast

The Iowa City Foreign Relations Council is happy to announce that our programs are now available for your listening pleasure, on iTunes and Apple Podcast. To find podcasts on iTunes, you can either click the PODCAST icon on the homepage, or click here . To listen to the podcast with Apple Podcast, please search for ICFRC on the Apple Podcast app and subscribe.

We hope you enjoy this great new way to enjoy our programs anywhere!

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Ron McMullen,Wednesday, August 22, 2018

d41dc110-e783-44a9-a5db-708138c3fadc“The Baltic States, NATO, and Russia”

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Ron McMullen, currently the University of Iowa’s Ambassador-in-Residence, served as U.S. Ambassador to Eritrea. Ron has over 30 years of diplomatic experience and has lived, worked, or traveled in over 100 countries. In Burma he worked closely with Aung San Suu Kyi and pro-democracy groups. He helped prevent civil conflict in Fiji. He was shot at in Sri Lanka, and helped train mongooses to detect heroin. He took Hillary Clinton on a tour of South Africa’s Robben Island with Nelson Mandela. Amidst his foreign assignments, Ron served for three years as Visiting Professor at the Military Academy at West Point, where he taught International Relations and Comparative Politics. He was Diplomat-In-Residence at the University of Texas at Austin from 2010 to 2012. He has

authored many scholarly works and is a three-time recipient of the State Department’s Superior Honor Award. A native of Northwood, Iowa, he earned his doctorate in Political Science from the University of Iowa.

The Baltic states – Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia – each contain large ethnic Russian minorities, share a border with Russia,
and are highly susceptible to Russian influence through media and money. These factors transform the Baltics into today’s front-line against Russian aggression. The presence of NATO forces within the Baltic states is both misunderstood by the public and contested by regional politics, yet NATO is essential to the security of the Western border against Russian expansionism.

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Filed under Fall 2018, Governance Issues, Russia and Central Asia, Uncategorized

Mandela Washington Fellows, Tuesday, July 24th

“Young Entrepreneurs Fostering Transformative Changes in Africa”

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image001Luana holds a degree in public relations and advertisements from the University of Istanbul. She currently works at Tiniguena, an NGO in Guinea-Bissau that works with biodiversity, where she assists with communication, youth, and civic duty. She hopes to start her own company and run it with the values of environment and sustainable development at its core.

image2Charles, CEO of “Akili Labs,” is currently completing a Masters of Science in Biotechnology from Rhodes University. Through his research on removal of toxic metals from waste water, he recognized the lack of medical diagnostics, which causes 12 million deaths annually in Africa. In response he built “Lab in Box”, which can perform medical diagnostics in the field.

image3Saeed founded “The Smile Shop Dental Clinics” to improve access to quality dental care in rural and urban communities. To make dental healthcare more affordable, he introduced an innovative dental savings plan. Saeed is currently working on adapting his current model for rural communities, where people can exchange farm produce or livestock. to pay for care.

image4Awa holds a Master’s Degree in Telecommunications Engineering from Telecom SudParis. After working in France and Senegal, she founded the Lifantou project in 2016, which uses crowd-sourced geospatial data to link farmers with school canteens. Her goal is to secure food for public school children, reinforce food distribution, and boost the agriculture sector.

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Filed under Africa, Business, Fall 2018, Past Events, Uncategorized

Lynda Barrow, Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Lynda Barrow photo

“Religion in a Globalizing World”

Lynda Barrow is currently a Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Coe College. She has been at Coe College since 1999, teaching a variety of courses on comparative and international politics. She received her Master’s degree in Theological Studies from Wesley Theological Seminary, and then went on to receive her Ph.D. from Syracuse University, where she completed dissertation research on Protestants and politics in Mexico. She still travels frequently to Mexico for research. She has also participated in several panels on “Ethical Perspectives on the News” with KCRG. In her free time, Lynda is active in her church, as well as with Habitat for Humanity and the Alzheimer’s Association.

In this week’s program, Lynda will speak on the topic of religious resurgence as one of the many changes in the post-Cold War world. Religion is reclaiming its place in the public square and on the international stage. According to western theories, this was not supposed to happen; the world was secularizing and leaving religion in its wake. In the Muslim world, Islamism is, in part, a response to Western-style modernization, which is bound up with secularization. In this context, religion can be a source of conflict or cooperation.

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Rubie Watson, Thursday, July 12, 2018

Rubie Watson photo

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“Hollowing Out the Middle: Chinese and American Rural Depopulation” 

Rubie Watson is a social anthropologist, now retired. She received her Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and has taught at the University of Pittsburgh and Harvard University. She is author of “Inequality among Brothers: Class and Kinship in South China” and has co-authored and edited books on Chinese society and culture.  Rubie is the former Director of Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archeology and Ethnology.  Currently, she is writing a book tentatively entitled “The Closers: Institutional Collapse in the Rural Midwest.” She grew up on a small Illinois farm and now lives in Iowa City and rural Illinois.

The U.S., China, and many other countries are experiencing significant rural depopulation. Recent changes in demographic trends will be discussed as well as consequences of depopulation on rural society and culture.

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Kevin Kelley,Thursday, May 10, 2018

sbye3fepzqefy0qdof2nWatch this program!

“Reaching Out to the World Through Non-Fiction Film”

Kevin Kelley has been a documentary filmmaker for over three decades. His work has been honored with two regional EMMY Awards, two CINE Golden Eagle Awards and Three New York Festivals World Medal. His work has been screened at The International Documentary Film Festival in Los Angles, The Newport Beach Film Festival, The New Filmmakers Festival in New York and aired on HBO, PBS and qualified in 2001 for the Short Documentary Category for the Academy Awards. Kelley has mentored other young filmmakers for over three decades who have gone on to work professionally for Oprah Winfrey, Warner Brothers, Lions Gate and Saturday Night Live.

Kevin is currently the Artistic Director for New Mile Media Arts, a non-profit that ‘educates and inspires through the art of filmmaking, presenting unique stories of  common people in uncommon situations.’ His current project, “Stout Hearted: George Stout, The Man Who Saved Art.” The documentary tells the story of the University of Iowa art student who became the leader of the Monuments Men, a military special forces unit assigned to retrieve art stolen art by the Nazis. It also explores Stout’s pioneering efforts in art conservation, which elevated the discipline into the world of modern science. Many of his discoveries are used globally to restore masterworks and protect them from deterioration.

 

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Filed under Arts & Culture, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Ashleigh Wallace & Eesha Patel, Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Headshot“Health Care for Underserved Populations in South India”

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Eesha Patel is a second year student at the College of Pharmacy. She was born in London, England and spent her formative years living in Nairobi, Kenya prior to moving to the United States. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Iowa. Eesha currently volunteers in the Emergency room as a student pharmacist, where she has the opportunity to interact with patients from many different demographics. In her free time, Eesha enjoys sipping on a cup of coffee and reading a good book.

Ashleigh Wallace is a third year pharmacy student here at the University of Iowa. She is originally from Northeast Texas. She completed pre-requisite education for pharmacy school at Iowa State University, and is currently working on a Global Health Studies certificate in conjunction with her PharmD. Her professional interests include working with underserved populations abroad and providing healthcare in low-access areas. She loves reading, baseball, hiking, and bike riding, and traveling to National Parks all over the United States.DSC_6638

This presentation will focus on the different perspectives and experiences from a summer spent in Saragur, India. Over the course of 8 weeks, our interns had the opportunity to learn, and grow, while contributing to a series of different projects. These projects were centered around many different areas of healthcare, and allowed both students to broaden their outlook as future healthcare practitioners.

 

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Filed under Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Roz Frank, Wednesday, April 25, 2018

elkar492“The Basque Country — Language, Culture, and Politics: A View from the Inside”

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Roslyn Frank obtained her B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. Post studies, she has used her credentials to serve the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Iowa, currently as a Professor Emeritus. Her research specializes in Basque Studies, Cognitive Linguistics, European ethnography, ethnomathematics, ethno- & archaeo- astronomy, informational technologies & orality, ecocriticism, Spanish civilization & Culture and Spanish Women Writers. Her knowledge of languages is extensive, being fluent in English, Spanish, Euskara, and having reading ability in French, German, Italian, Catalan, Portuguese, and Russian.

Roslyn Frank will be sharing her experiences in the Basque Country (Euskal Herria) where for the past forty years she has carried out fieldwork and related investigations. The talk will begin with a brief overview of how the Basque Country is seen from the outside, for example, by visitors as well as how she originally saw it when she first went there and before she learned Euskara, the Basque language. The outside perspective often casts the Basque people, their language, culture and political beliefs—as if they represented the ultimate “outsiders” vis-à-vis the rest of Europe. Her research, facilitated by having learned Euskara, led to a truly remarkable discovery, namely, that the Basques used to believe they descended from bears, an indigenous belief system that appears to have been shared by other Europeans. In short, this revised perspective provides a lens through which an indigenous ecocentric worldview starts to come into focus.

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Filed under Arts & Culture, Europe, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Mark Kende, Thursday, April 19, 2018

large“South African Politics & Their Constitution: 20 Years Plus After Apartheid”

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Mark Kende is the James Madison Chair in Constitutional Law at the Drake University Constitutional Law Center. He has served as a Professor of Law at the University of Montana in addition to serving as a Visiting Professor of Law at several institutions including University of Paris II, University of Nantes, and Notre Dame. As a previous Fulbright Senior Scholar, Mark was invited to serve as a Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa.

Mark’s areas of expertise focus on Constitutional Law, Comparative Constitutionalism, Civil Rights, Cyberlaw, and Civil Procedure. His work in South Africa focuses on many of these topics. He has published book related projects and law review articles addressing South African politics, in particular the current state since the end of the apartheid period. Mark’s most notable work is Constitutional Rights in Two Worlds: South Africa the United States (2009). His talk will address the current state of South African constitutional law.

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Filed under Africa, Governance Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Mariola Espinosa ,Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Mariola Head Shot“Surviving Hurricanes in  Puerto Rico”

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Mariola Espinosa is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Iowa and an Associate Professor Adjunct in the Section of the History of Medicine at Yale University. She is a historian of medicine and public health in the Caribbean and Latin America. Her current research looks at medical understandings of fever in the French, British, Spanish, and U.S. Caribbean empires. The high level of language proficiency she possesses in English, French, and Spanish is understandably a great aid in this research.

She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on the history of Cuba; disease, public health, and empire; the history of medicine and public health in Latin America; disease in the Caribbean; global history of Latin American science and medicine; and readings on disease in the Caribbean.

Devastated by a string of hurricanes in 2017, the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico has struggled to recover from the widespread damage to lives and infrastructure. However, hurricanes are a regular occurrence in the Gulf of Mexico and Puerto Rico is no stranger to them. Mariola Espinosa will have a conversation on how the country has managed to cope with such hostile weather.

 

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Filed under Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Elise Pizzi, Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Pizzi, Elise“Political Conflicts Among Ethnic Minorities in China”

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Elise Pizzi is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa. Currently, she is teaching a graduate level course on Chinese Politics and an undergraduate course on Comparative Environmental Policy. Past courses she Elise taught at the University of Iowa concerned political violence and global development. She earned her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Colorado in 2015.  Before attending graduate school, she taught English in Sichuan, China and spent two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Republic of Georgia (2005-2007). Her research primarily focuses on less developed regions and countries, in particular in China.  She studies distributive politics, including government provision of public goods and services, and natural resource management. Her ongoing research focuses on ethnic politics and poverty alleviation in rural China. Elise received a Fulbright grant to study drinking water access in rural China in 2013. She regularly returns to China for ongoing research and to indulge her love of spicy sour soup.

Who are China’s ethnic minorities? Professor Pizzi will discuss the identity and political status of China’s ethnic minority groups and minority autonomous regions.  She also will present ongoing research related to political action by ethnic minorities in China.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

Rachel Maggi, Daniel Valentin, Ashley Chong, Thursday, March 29, 2018

FlagsinHands_178558850“Here and Abroad: Three  University of Iowa Seniors Speak to the Relevance of Their International Experiences ”

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As ICFRC interns, Maggi, Valentin, and Chong assist the organization in bringing local and international experts into Iowa City and witness how the professional world engages with global topics. Additionally, as International Studies students, they are equipped through their coursework to critically engage with the world and its different cultures. Each student has a unique blend of international experience, extracurricular activities, and academic backgrounds that led them to engage with the global community in different capacities. They will share the importance and impacts of their international experiences, both abroad and within campus organizations.

Rachel Maggi is an International Studies major focusing in South Asian Studies and East Asian Studies with a minor in Global Health and certificate in Sustainability. Her international travels include study abroad and interning in India, as well as miscellaneous travels to France, Mexico, the Bahamas, and Canada. She has recently been awarded a Fulbright to conduct research on breast/cervical cancer knowledge and perceptions in Karnataka, India. She hopes to pursue a Master’s in Public Health in the future.

Daniel Valentin is an International Studies major focusing on Development and Islamic & Middle Eastern Studies, with a minor in Arabic and a Writing Certificate.   He has studied abroad in Fes, Morocco and Pondicherry, India. In his time as an undergraduate, he has held positions in the Daily Iowan, the Association of Latinos Moving Ahead, the Human Rights Student Collective, Secular Students at Iowa, and the University of Iowa Student Government.

Ashley Chong is an International Studies major focusing in East Asia and Post-Colonial/Diasporic Studies, with a minor in Anthropology and a Writing Certificate. She has moved a total of seven times across South-East Asia and North America before coming to Iowa. Beyond academics, she is a member of a string quartet within the School of Music that will tour Iowa this summer, curates collaborations across disciplines, is part of the executive board of the Translate Iowa Project, and performs at local venues and events as one half of the Dashi Project.

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Filed under Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Laura Kennedy, Thursday, March 22, 2018

laura-kennedy_11_0“State of State: One Year into the Trump Administration”

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Laura Kennedy served almost four decades as a U.S. career diplomat. She spent much of her career working in or on the former Soviet Union and served in Geneva and Vienna (thrice) on multilateral disarmament and non-proliferation (conventional, nuclear and bio) as well as a number of temporary assignments in New York, including the 2010 and 2015 NPT Review Conferences. She retired in 2013 but was soon after recalled to service to head U.S. missions in Turkmenistan and Vienna. She retired again in 2015.

Kennedy’s assignments included Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Southern Europe, Central Asia and the Caucasus, Ambassador to Turkmenistan, Ambassador to the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, U.S. Special Representative for Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention Issues, Deputy Commandant of the National War College, Charge d’Affaires in Armenia, and Deputy Political section chief in Moscow and Ankara. She is an elected member of the American Academy of Diplomacy and serves on the boards of the World Affairs Council in DC, the Arms Control Association, the Center for Arms Control and Nonproliferation and Foreign Policy for America. She has lectured at various U.S. institutions including the U.S. Army General command and Staff College and the Army War College. A graduate of America’s first women’s college, Vassar, Kennedy also did graduate work at Stanford and American (M.A.) Universities.

It has been over a year since President Trump was elected into office. In this span of time, observable differences can be seen in how the Trump Administration has chosen to handle the State Department from that of his predecessors. Laura Kennedy will draw on her experience and connection to the State Department to discuss its current status under the Trump Administration.

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

David Miles, Thursday, March 8, 2018.

David_Miles6“An International Rocket Field School at the Andøya Space Center in Norway”

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In January 2018 two University of Iowa undergraduate students travelled to the Andøya Space Center in northern Norway to complete a week long sounding rocket field school called CaNoRock (Canada/Norway Sounding Rocket Program). CaNoRock uses student rocket activities as a high profile talent magnet to attract undergraduate students into space-related career paths, to enhance discovery learning through practical hands-on instruction, and to create an exceptional learning environment for undergraduate students. The ultimate goal of CaNoRock is to build scientific and technological research capacity by helping undergraduate students to transition into space-related graduate study and industry. This was the first time that a US University has participated in this international field school and we are now seeking funding to enable ongoing participation of University of Iowa undergraduate students. This colloquia describes the field school and its pedagogical approach and presents the experience through the eyes of the two participating undergraduate students.

Dr. David Miles

Assistant Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy

David Miles is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Iowa. Professor Miles is an experimental space physicist specializing in the development of the next-generation space-flight magnetic field instruments and particularly miniature instruments for nanosatellites and multipoint measurement instrument constellations. His research interests include space weather, solar-terrestrial physics, and auroral dynamics including magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. He is the Co-PI of the magnetic field instrument (MGF) on the Canadian Cassiope/e-POP spacecraft and is the Instrument PI for the miniature digital fluxgate magnetometer (DFGM) on the Ex-Alta-1 CubeSat. He has provided fluxgate magnetometer for two sub-orbital sounding rockets (ICI-4 and Maxidusty-1b) and several ground observatories. Professor Miles was named one of Alberta’s Most Influential People: The Next 10 by Alberta Venture Magazine in 2015. He received his PhD from the University of Alberta in 2017. He has eleven peer reviewed publications with five as first author.

Hannah Gulick – sophomore from Spirit Lake, Iowa

I am a sophomore at the University of Iowa studying astronomy, physics, and English Creative Writing. I work on several research projects with the astronomy faculty, concerning space instrumentation, X-ray astronomy, and radio astronomy. Someday I hope to be a researching astrophysicist using space instruments and observation to answer important astronomical questions.

Josh Larson – senior from Mount Pleasant

I am currently pursuing two degrees at the University of Iowa, a B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering and a B.S. in Physics. My current ambitions are to attend graduate school in pursuit of a PhD in space physics, possibly focused on solar physics, certainly with regards to experimentation and instrument development for measuring space plasmas. I decided to pursue both engineering and physics because I’ve always wanted a chance to work with space systems.

 

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Filed under Europe, Past Events, Spring 2018, Technology, Uncategorized

Debora Matthews, Thursday, March 1, 2018

DeboraMatthews“Guarding Against Forgetting – Breaking the Silence: A Story of Political Awakening and Activist Archives in South Africa”

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Debora Matthews worked for seven years as Archival Coordinator in the Struggles for Justice Programme at the South African History Archive (SAHA), an independent activist and human rights archive in Johannesburg. SAHA is an independent human rights archive dedicated to documenting, supporting and promoting greater awareness of past and current struggles for justice through archival practices and outreach, and the access to information laws. Established by anti-apartheid activists in the 1980s, SAHA was closely connected in its formative years to the United Democratic Front, the Congress of South African Trade Unions and the African National Congress. Matthews archived the Constitution Hill Collection at SAHA.  Debra  is now an Archives Consult working for the Public Affairs Research Institute (PARI), developing and implementing a records and research data management system. She will also be working as a Contract Archivist at GALA, the Gay and Lesbian Memory in Action Archives at the University of the Witwatersrand.

Debora will discuss the many roads she has traveled as a middleclass Afrikaans woman. In this quest she continues to better understand her Afrikaner roots, as well as better understand the decades of racial segregation under Nationalist government rule. She has come to terms with these two things through her work with activist archives as she continues to better comprehend the injustices done to millions of South Africans during apartheid. Her talk will be a glimpse into some of the most exciting and prolific activist archives in South Africa.

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Filed under Africa, Governance Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Jeff Biggers, Thursday, February 22, 2018

Jeff-Biggers-author-photo-credit-Miriam-Alarcón-Avila- - Copy“RESISTANCE: Reclaiming an American Tradition ”

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Jeff Biggers is the American Book Award–winning author of several works of history, memoir, journalism, and theater, including The United States of Appalachia, praised by the Citizen Times as a “masterpiece of popular history”; State Out of the Union, selected by Publishers Weekly as a Top Ten Social Science book in 2012; and Reckoning at Eagle Creek, winner of the Delta Prize for Literature and David Brower Award for Environmental Reporting.

Biggers is the founder of the Climate Narrative Project, an arts and advocacy project for schools, universities and organizations. From 2014-2017, he served as the Sustainability Writer-in-Residence at the University of Iowa. He also served as the Campbell-Stripling Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Wesleyan College in Georgia. Over the past decade, Biggers has given lectures, readings and performances at over 100 universities and colleges across the country, from the University of California in Berkeley to the University of Mississippi to Yale University. He has delivered keynote addresses at numerous literary, educational, urban planning and environmental conferences and serves as a contributing editor to The Bloomsbury Review, and is a member of the PEN American Center.

“In a riveting and inspiring narrative history, Jeff Biggers’ Resistance reframes today’s battles as a continuum of a vibrant American tradition, chronicling the courageous and often squabbling resistance movements that insured the benchmarks of our democracy—and served on the front lines of the American Revolution, the defense of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, the defeat of fascism during World War II, and various civil rights movements. Resistance is a provocative reconsideration of the American Revolution and its unfolding promises. It brings to life early Native American, African American and immigrant struggles, women’s rights, and the pioneering environmental justice movements and their presence today. Biggers shows how a republic of resistance has served as a de facto “Truth and Reconciliation” commission for our history, especially in times when our nation—and its leaders—need to be held accountable.”

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

Dr. Gavin Slade, Thursday, February 15, 2018

s200_gavin.slade“Good Governance? Prison Gangs and Informal Order in the Former Soviet Union ”

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Gavin Slade is a lecturer at the University of Glasgow, who works on questions of criminal justice reform in the former Soviet Union. He has worked at Ilia State University, Tbilisi and the University of Toronto. Directly prior to coming to Glasgow, Slade was a Research Fellow at the Freie Universitat, Berlin. Slade’s work as a criminologist is underpinned by an interest in the social organization of violence in the former Soviet Republics and has focused particularly on organized crime, policing, prison reform and the politics of crime. His first book was published with Oxford University Press in 2013 entitled ‘Reorganizing Crime: Mafia and Anti-Mafia in Post-Soviet Georgia.’

The concept of ‘governance’ has become salient in the study of organized crime. Recent US literature on prison gangs suggest that gangs emerge to meet demands for governance of social and economic interactions where the state cannot or will not do this. As such, prison gangs, far from being a symptom of dysfunction in fact are highly complex organizations that produce public goods, including the control of violence. Gavin’s research analyses data from a research project that analyses penal reform efforts that target prison gang structures in former Soviet prisons, specifically in Georgia, Lithuania, Kyrgyzstan, and Moldova. His research utilizes a survey and interview data of prisoners in Moldova to analyze the problem of prison subculture and its links to prison violence in this case. Gavin’s research finds that, contrary to some claims in the US literature, where prison gangs are present in Moldova this correlates with a poorer prison environment and greater insecurity among prisoners and staff.

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Filed under Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

Rabbi Esther Hugenholtz, Thursday, February 8, 2018

Rabbi“Stranger in a Strange Land: Personal and Philosophical Reflections of an EU National in Brexit-Referendum Britain”

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Rabbi Esther Hugenholtz (1978) was born in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. She spent the majority of her childhood in southern Spain. After completing her high school education, she moved back to the Netherlands where she obtained her M.Sc. (Master of Science) in Cultural Anthropology and Sociology of non-Western Societies from the University of Amsterdam. Furthering her Jewish education, she studied at the Conservative Yeshiva in Jerusalem, Israel and was an E. Levinas Fellow at Paideia, the European Institute of Jewish Studies in Stockholm, Sweden.

Esther completed the first two years of her rabbinical training at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, a seminary affiliated with the Conservative/Masorti movement of Judaism and interned as a Rabbinic Fellow at the American Jewish University. She completed the remaining three years of her rabbinical training at Leo Baeck College in London, UK and was ordained a rabbi with this seminary in 2013.

Rabbi Esther Hugenholtz has served as the Associate Rabbi at Sinai Synagogue in Leeds and is very excited to be the new Rabbi for Congregation Agudas Achim, Iowa City, Iowa. She is married to Dave Middleton and the proud mother of preschooler Jonathan and toddler Noa.

In her free time, she enjoys composing liturgical music, songwriting, writing, travelling, photography and cooking. She takes an interest in issues of multiculturalism and social justice and firmly believes in representing a socially-relevant and spiritually-compelling Judaism for today’s world.

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Filed under Europe, Governance Issues, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Don Gurnett, Thursday, February 1, 2018

DonGurnettinfrontofminispacecraft“Sixty Years of Space Research at Iowa: The Legacy of  James A. Van Allen ”

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This presentation is given in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the launch of Explorer 1, the first U.S. spacecraft, and the discovery of Earth’s radiation belts by James A. Van Allen of the University of Iowa. The talk will describe the events leading up to the discovery of Earth’s radiation belts and will describe the tremendous expansion of space research at Iowa over the next 60 years, including the construction of seven successful Earth-orbiting spacecraft and instrumentation on some seventy spacecraft, including such famous planetary missions as the Voyagers 1 and 2 flights to the outer planets, the Galileo orbiter of Jupiter, and the Cassini orbiter of Saturn. Future missions include a flight closer to the Sun than ever previously achieved, and radars on two spacecraft designed to explore the icy moons of Jupiter.

Don Gurnett started his science career by working on spacecraft electronics design as a student employee in The University of Iowa Physics Department in 1959. After completing his B.S. in Electrical Engineering at Iowa, he transferred to physics, where he received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1963 and 1965. He spent one year, from 1964 to 1965, as a NASA Trainee at Stanford University, and was appointed Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa in 1965 with subsequent promotions to Associate Professor and to Professor in 1968 and 1972.

Don specializes in the study of space plasma physics and has participated in over 40 spacecraft projects, most notably the Voyager 1 and 2 flights to the outer planets, the Galileo mission to Jupiter, and the Cassini mission to Saturn. He is the author/co-author of over 650 scientific publications, primarily in the area of magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research. Now in his 53rd year on the faculty at Iowa, he has received many awards for his teaching and research, including the M. L. Huit Faculty Award, the Iowa Regents Award for Faculty Excellence, and elected memberships in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

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Filed under Information Posts, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Alle McNorton, Thursday, January 25, 2018

Alle McNorton picture“Sui Generis, Kosovo, and Iowa’s Unique Relationship with this New Balkan State”

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Alle McNorton is a 3rd year law student at the University of Iowa College of Law. During the spring semester of 2017, she lived in Prishtina, Kosovo and worked in the Republic of Kosovo, Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

At Iowa Law, she currently serves as an Iowa Law Ambassador, Senior Articles Editor for The Journal of Gender, Race & Justice, and is Graduate Member of the UI Council on the Status of Women,  and Research Assistant for Associate Dean of Comparative and International Programs Adrien Wing, board member of the Equal Justice Foundation, and a member of the Pro Bono Society Member, Phi Delta Phi, International Law Society, OWLSS, OutLaws, EJF, BLSA, and I.O.W.A.

Alle McNorton will be discussing the historical, legal, and international relations concepts behind Kosovo’s independence and subsequent developments. She will address Kosovo’s goal of becoming a member of the EU and the hurdles they face. Lastly, she will conclude with Iowa’s unique relationship with Kosovo and the field placement program that allowed her to have this incredible experience.

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Europe, Past Events, Spring 2018, Uncategorized

Jeff Murray, Thursday, January 18, 2018

murrayjc“How the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Uses Innovation to Accelerate Equity in Low and Middle Income Countries”

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Jeff Murray, M.D, is Deputy Director of Family Health in the Discovery and Translational Sciences for The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. In addition, he is Board Certified in Pediatrics and Clinical Genetics, and is a human molecular / developmental geneticist and researcher at the University of Iowa.

He received his B.S. in Biology at MIT, and did his M.D., and pediatrics residency at Tufts, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington.  He has also done sabbaticals at Oxford University and the University of Southern Denmark.

Jeff led the development of the first user enabled genetic linkage maps of the Human Genome Center at the University of Iowa, and identified the first genes associated with cleft lip/palate and glaucoma.  He also oversaw the first genome wide association study of preterm birth.  He is the co-author on 470 peer-reviewed articles.  He is Past President of the American Society of Human Genetics and is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine and Fellow of AAAS.

Jeff Murray will speak about his work with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as Deputy Director of Family Health in the Discovery and Translational Sciences Group, and his team’s responsibility for the Healthy Birth, Growth, and Development programs with an emphasis on preterm birth and early childhood physical and cognitive development.

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Filed under Education, Health & Medicine, Past Events, Spring 2018, The Middle East, Uncategorized

Paul Greenough,Thursday, December 14, 2017

Picture1“Chasing Urban Crows in India: A Fool’s Errand to Mend an Environmental Crisis? ”

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Paul R. Greenough is Emeritus Professor of Modern Indian History and of Community and Behavioral Health at the University of Iowa. He was the Director of the University’s South Asian Studies Program and co-director of the Global Health Studies Program.  He earned his bachelor’s degree from Columbia University and his PhD from the University of Chicago.  His recent research concerns themes in India’s environmental history and the history of public health and the introduction of field epidemiology into the post-colonial world. Among other works he is the author of Prosperity and Misery in Modern Bengal: the Famine of 1943 (1982; reprint edition 2017; Bengali edition 1997) and co-editor of three collections: Nature in the Global South: Environmental Projects in South and Southeast Asia (2003), Against Stigma: Global Studies in Caste and Race (2009), and The Politics of Vaccination: A Global History (2017).  Professor Greenough is a Senior Fulbright-Nehru Fellow attached to the Department of History of Jadavpur University.

The house crows of India, as the name suggests, live side by side with humans in towns and cities. They mainly survive by eating left-over food wastes (garbage). They are highly intelligent birds and occupy a middle position between wild nature and human culture; they show up prominently in Indian art, religion, literature and folklore. From ancient times the cawing of crows has been India’s sound-track. Nowadays their voice is fainter because of intense environmental hazards, and crow populations in larger Indian cities are declining. At the same time Indian house crows have been spreading to other countries (for example, a breeding colony was established in Florida only in 2015). This talk recaps a recent research trip he made to study house crows in India and the challenges he faces writing about their saga.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Fall 2017, Past Events, Uncategorized

Mariano Magalhães and Elisa Klewinski,Wednesday, December 6, 2017

IMG_4332“The Economic and Political Challenges Confronting Brazil ”

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Dr. Mariano Magalhães is a professor of Political Science at Augustana College, where he teaches courses that focus primarily on the consolidation and quality of democracy in the developing world, with a special emphasis on Latin America. Dr. Magalhães was a Fulbright Scholar at the Universidade de Brasília in 2011 and currently serves as Director of the Brazil Term Study Abroad Program, Director of the Africana Studies Program, and Chair of the Division of Social Sciences at Augustana College. He has published articles on the impact of decentralization on democracy in Brazil, the role of the Brazilian armed forces in post-1985 Brazil and this past summer conducted research on the relationship between feminist civil society and the state in Brazil.

Elisa Klewinski is a junior Political Science and Environmental Studies double major at Augustana College. She recently spent five and a half weeks in Rio de Janeiro and Salvador studying the nature of democracy and the state of economic development in Brazil.

In the span of roughly a generation Brazilian democracy has gone from being labeled as “feckless” and the economy as “drunk” in the early 1990s to being hailed for its innovative social policies, emerging economy and robust democracy in the first part of the 21st century (under the guidance primarily of former President Lula da Silva) and, in the last three years, back to economic paralysis and political crisis, amid the worst corruption scandal in the history of the country. The goal of our presentation is to show that these characterizations tend to exaggerate both the bad and the good of Brazil during these periods. Instead, by most accounts, Brazil is now an established democracy but with flaws. The most recent crisis has deeply divided the nation, leading many Brazilians to question the legitimacy of not only the current government but of the democratic project itself. The impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff in 2016 and the greed of so many politicians caught up in the Lava-Jato corruption scandal has led to high levels of popular disenchantment and dissatisfaction of the political elite. Despite this, democracy shows signs of significant growth, with the development of strong institutions of accountability, especially the judiciary and the media, a vibrant civil society and the following of democratic political rules by key actors.

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Filed under Economics, Fall 2017, Past Events, Uncategorized

Sara Mitchell ,Thursday, November 30, 2017

Mitchell_2017_0

“Patterns of Maritime Conflicts, 1900-2010”

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Sara McLaughlin Mitchell is the F. Wendell Miller Professor of Political Science at the University of Iowa. She has authored five books, the most recent being What Do We Know About Civil Wars? and has edited several special journal issues and published more than forty journal articles and book chapters. She is the recipient of several major research awards from the Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, and the United States Agency for International Development. Her areas of expertise include international conflict, political methodology, and gender issues in academia. Professor Mitchell is co-founder of the Journeys in World Politics workshop, a mentoring workshop for junior women studying international relations. She has received several prestigious awards, the most recent being the Quincy Wright Distinguished Scholar Award (2015) from the International Studies Association, and served as President of the Peace Science Society.

There is little understanding of their generalizable patterns with respect to claim onset and management. This project utilizes data from the Issue Correlates of War (ICOW) on diplomatic claims over maritime areas globally from 1900-2010 to explore patterns in states’ interactions over territorial and resource issues of the seas. Initial results suggest that potential oil resources are more dangerous for producing militarized disputes than extracted oil resources (or none). Migratory fish stocks also raise the risks for militarized confrontation over maritime claims. Surprisingly, maritime claims are more likely to occur between wealthier and more democratic countries, although escalation of such disputes to fatal militarized disputes is rare. These findings will help us understand how prominent cases like the South China Sea disputes fit into the broader landscape of maritime conflicts.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, War & Conflict

T.B. Bram Elias,Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Bram photo“Immigration Hits Home: How New Immigration Policies Affect Iowa City and How Iowa City is Responding”

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Professor Bram Elias is a Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Iowa’s College of Law and directs the Clinic’s immigration practice. Bram received his BA from the University of Michigan, an MA from The Queen’s University in Belfast, an MPP from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and a JD from the Yale University Law School.  He also clerked for Senior Judge Dorothy Nelson of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for Judge Denise Casper of the US District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

Prior to joining the University of Iowa College of Law, Bram worked as an immigration attorney in private practice in Iowa City, where his work focused on federal immigration law, removal defense, immigration-related family law issues in state court, and immigration-related post-conviction review and habeas corpus litigation in state and federal courts.  Professor Elias’ students practice before federal immigration courts and administrative bodies, the federal Board of Immigration Appeals, and state and federal courts and both the trial and appellate levels.

Bram will be speaking about the most common problems and changes that are seen locally as a result of the new tenor of immigration politics and policies being spread by the Trump Administration. He will give specific examples in his discussion, such as cases where members of immigrant communities are too afraid to talk to local law enforcement or go to court, children of mixed-status families refusing free and reduced lunch at school, and members of immigrant communities being too afraid to go to the emergency room. He will also speak about his students’ work within the area, such as working with the Johnson County Community ID program, helping set up new organizations like the Eastern Iowa Community Bond Fund, designing bespoke “power of attorney”/ “in case of emergency” legal packets for individual families, and more.

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Fall 2017, Governance Issues, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Elizabeth Menninga, Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Menninga_2017_0“Mediation to End Civil Wars: Assembling the Dream Team”

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Elizabeth Menninga is an Assistant Professor in the Political Science department at the University of Iowa. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2015, specializing in International Relations and Political Methodology. Her research focuses on the effectiveness of international mediation in intrastate wars. Elizabeth teaches undergraduate courses in international relations and research methods as well as graduate statistics courses. Her most recent article, “Kantian fractionalization predicts the conflict propensity of the international system” published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, won the 2016 Political Ties award for best paper published on political networks.

Elizabeth will be discussing her research on when and how multiparty mediation can help the prospects for peace in civil wars. She identifies three characteristics of mediation efforts expected to improve mediation’s chances of success. These three being complementary efforts, balanced mediation, and coordination among the mediators. To evaluate these characteristics, she employs statistical tests on a set of mediation attempts in civil wars between 1989 and 2005. She will also discuss two specific cases of multiparty mediation: Angola and Mozambique. Elizabeth will discuss her findings and what light they bring to how multiparty mediation helps the prospects for peace in civil wars.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Governance Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

America Colemenares, Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Screenshot_20171013-160536“Venezuela in Crisis”

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America Colmenares is a native of Caracas, Venezuela.  She moved to the United States in 1989 to study English and graduated from Augustana College in 1997 with a B.A. in Communications, Political Sciences, and Spanish and Literature.  In 2001, America graduated from the University of Kansas with a Masters in Latin American Studies with an emphasis in business and politics.  After graduate school, America worked at the University of Miami as a Spanish Lecturer. She came to Augustana College in the fall of 2006.  At Augustana, America teaches beginner and intermediate Spanish, Latin American History and Civilization, Business in Latin America, and Latinos in the United States.   She is also a First Year Advisor working closely with multicultural and international students.  Her passion is to educate people about Latin America in all of its aspects.

What was once the richest country in South America in 2001, Venezuela has found itself in an economic crisis with an increasingly authoritarian government. In the midst of this, food and medicine shortages leave its people in a desperate state. Many of which have fled to neighboring countries to escape the hardship. America Colmenares will provide an overview on how Venezuela, once a wealthy oil country, has now found itself in crisis.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Past Events, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

Andrea Cohen, Thursday, October 26, 2017

edited pic“The UN is Our Greatest Hope for the Future”

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Andrea Cohen is a passionate human rights defender and supporter of the UN. She is Executive Director of the Iowa United Nations Association whose mission is to promote, educate about, and advocate for the entire United Nations system. Ms. Cohen attended the United Nations International School in New York, giving her a special connection with the organization. Ms. Cohen has a Bachelors in Anthropology from Barnard College and a Masters in Anthropology and Education, from Teacher’s College, Columbia University. She also has a Master of Science in Teaching (Social Studies and Civics) from the Free University in Amsterdam. Originally Dutch, Ms. Cohen moved to New York City in the early 1960s, living there for 28 years before moving back to The Netherlands. She came back to Iowa City with her family in 2012. She is an Iowa City Human Rights Commissioner and a member of the Board of the University of Iowa Center for Human Rights.

The fundamental principles of the United Nations are as vital today as they were in 1945; perhaps even more so. Focusing inwards is not a solution when the world is so interconnected. The 17 UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development provide a framework for tackling sticky problems together: for Iowa, the US, and the world. Her remarks will explore why and how the Global Goals urge cooperation and collaboration on a global scale. For the goals to be reached, everyone needs to do their part: governments, the private sector, civil society and people like you.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please renew your ICFRC membership.

 

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Filed under Domestic Issues, Fall 2017, Governance Issues, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Juan R.I. Cole, Tuesday, October 17, 2017

la-ca-jc-juan-cole-20140720“The New Arabs: U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East”

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Juan R. I. Cole is the Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan. He received his B.A. in History and Literature of Religions from Northwestern University, his M.A. in Arabic Studies / History from American University in Cairo, and his Ph.D. in Islamic Studies from UCLA. Juan speaks Arabic and possesses skill in Persian, Urdu, and reads Turkish. He is the author of Engaging the Muslim World and Napoleon’s Egypt. He has been a regular guest on PBS NewsHour and has also appeared on ABC World News, Nightline, the Today show, Charlie Rose, Anderson Cooper 360, The Rachel Maddow Show, The Colbert Report, Democracy!, Al Jazeera America, and many other programs. He has commented extensively on al-Qaeda and the Taliban, Iraq, Egypt, the politics of Pakistan and Afghanistan, Syria, and Iranian domestic struggles and foreign affairs.

For thirty-five years, he has sought to put the relationship of the West and the Muslim world in historical context. His deep knowledge of language, Middle Eastern Culture, and the differing theological traditions of Islam, have made him an authority on the region. Professor Cole will be discussing his most recent book, The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is Changing the Middle East will be the focus of his presentation.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Past Events, The Middle East, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Karen Wachsmuth, Thursday, October 12, 2017

 Karen in Japan 2“Why the Japanese School Year Begins in Cherry Blossom Time”

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Karen Wachsmuth will share her recent experiences as a Fulbright International Education Administrator awardee to Japan. While in the country, she met with Ministry of Education officials, top-level university administrators, professors, high school teachers, guidance counselors, students, and job placement agencies. She will share with us how their differing viewpoints reflected unique and sometimes contradictory aspects of Japanese culture and history. She will also discuss the context of her travels to Hiroshima, Tokyo, and Kyoto, which took place during a year in which U.S.-Japan relations were undergoing epic, positive change.

Wachsmuth is a Juilliard-trained conductor, musician, and scholar. Under her dynamic and innovative leadership as the UI Fulbright Program Advisor, the University of Iowa was named a top producer of Fulbright students for 2016-17, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education. This is the second year in a row that UI has achieved this elite ranking.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under China & East Asia, Fall 2017, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Steve Schulz, Wednesday, October 4, 2017

      EP-170119847 (1)“Travel Bans: Uncertainties and Real World Consequences”

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Steve Schulz is the Senior Director for the Global Talent Acquisition and Mobility organization at Rockwell-Collins.  His responsibilities include all recruiting efforts across the globe, foreign national employee strategy, contract labor, relocation, mobility, short and long-term assignments, K-12 STEM efforts, and external diversity partnerships.  Steve has been a leader in the talent acquisition efforts for more than two decades spending half his time in the external agency industry and the other half leading talent acquisition functions.

Rockwell-Collins employs 30,000 people worldwide and is one of Iowa’s largest employers with 8,700 employees in Cedar Rapids plus another 1,200 employees in other Eastern Iowa locations including Iowa City.  Founded in 1933, Rockwell-Collins is the industry leader in advanced avionics for commercial and military aircraft.

This presentation will focus on Rockwell-Collins foreign national employment strategy and why it is a critical element for our company’s people strategy.  Changes to the program including current global and political challenges confronting our organization will be discussed.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Governance Issues, Past Events, Technology, U.S. Foreign Policy, Uncategorized

Ubah Cristina Ali Farah, Thursday, September 28, 2017

Ubah“To Leave in the Afternoon: Inheriting the Language of a Civil War”

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Ubah Cristina Ali Farah is a Somali-Italian novelist, performer, teacher and social activist. Her two novels, Madre piccola [Little Mother, Indiana UP 2011] and Il Comandante del fiume [The Commander of the River] tell stories of the Somali civil war and its refugees in Italy. In 2006, she was awarded the Lingua Madre National Literary Prize, and in 2008, the Vittorini Prize. She has a PhD in African Studies from the University of Naples; currently she lives in Brussels. She is participating in the International Writing Program’s 2017 Fall Residency courtesy of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs at the U.S. Department of State.

Born in Italy to a Somali father and an Italian mother, Ubah Cristina Ali Farah grew up in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, attending an Italian school there until the Somalia Civil War broke out in 1991.  Ali Farah and her family subsequently relocated to Pécs, Hungary, and then later moved back to her birthplace, Verona, Italy.  In the intervening years, she has carried with her a Somali language that was radically re-shaped by the conflict and stories that seem like her own memories.  Farah draws on Eva Hoffman’s concept of “postmemory” to describe the effect of these traumatic experiences on the entire generation born after the Civil War.  In this lunchtime lecture, Ubah Cristina Ali Farah will share her experiences as a writer addressing violence, civil division, and national memory.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please remember to renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Uncategorized, War & Conflict

Greg Carmichael, Wednesday, September 20, 2017

“Current Environmental Challenges”gcarmich

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Gregory R. Carmichael is the Karl Kammermeyer Professor of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the University of Iowa and he is the Co-Director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research.  Greg also serves as the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research for the College of Engineering.

He has done extensive research related to air quality and its environmental impacts with over 280 journal publications, and he is a leader in the development and application of chemical transport models at scales ranging from local to global. The majority of his recent papers deal with the development and application of chemical transport models (CTM) to studies in regional atmospheric chemistry, air quality and climate. He is a member of the scientific steering committee for the UNEP ABC Asia project. He also serves as chair of the Scientific Advisory Group for the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmospheric Watch Urban Meteorology and Environment project, which is focused on building capacity worldwide to improve air quality forecasts and related services.

Much has changed since the 2015 historic Paris Climate Accord.  Even though the U.S. has expressed its plan to withdraw from the agreement, there remain many efforts at local, regional and global scales to address climate and environmental change. Post-Paris opportunities for addressing climate and the challenges to come with them will be discussed.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please remember to renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Environmental Issues, Fall 2017, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, Technology, Uncategorized

Ted Powers, Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Theodore Powers

“Public Health in Post-Apartheid South Africa: HIV/AIDS, Primary Care & Social Inequality”

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Ted Powers is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research focuses on the dynamics of health, politics, and social inequality in post-apartheid South Africa. Ted received his B.A. in Political Science (2001) at Bates College in Maine as well as his Master’s (2007) and Ph.D. in Anthropology (2012) at City University in New York. Ted has written numerous pieces of literature discussing the subject of HIV/AIDS for publications such as the Journal of African History, the AIDS Legal Quarterly, the Journal of Southern African Studies, the Journal of Modern African Studies, and The Human Economy Book Series. Before coming to the University of Iowa, Ted taught at Hunter College, Columbia University, Pace College, and the University of Pretoria.

The post-apartheid era has seen improvements in public health provision in South Africa, with the expansion of primary care and development of the world’s largest HIV / AIDS treatment program.  However, the country also has a high burden of disease, with the world’s largest HIV / AIDS epidemic and a growing drug-resistant Tuberculosis epidemic. Amid the threat of declining donor funding for HIV / AIDS and other global programs, the question of how public health will be maintained in the world’s second most unequal society looms large. Key public health trends will be discussed alongside the implications of declining resources for public health programs in South Africa.

Reminder: If you have not already done so, please remember to renew your ICFRC membership.

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Filed under Fall 2017, Health & Medicine, Past Events

Jonathan Hollander, Thursday September 7, 2017

10686686_10153064077701410_5106998071599227401_n “Dance Diplomacy”

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Jonathan is one of the world’s outstanding choreographers, a man committed to international cultural exchange and social activism through dance. He is the Founder of Battery Dance and Dancing to Connect. Jonathan Hollander is the founder of Battery Dance, a group that teaches, performs, and advocates for the area of dance. Currently he serves as its President and Artistic Director.

In 1982, he created Downtown Dance Festival, New York City’s longest-running dance festival. Jonathan and his organization are very active in NYC’s public schools with the objective of reaching at risk youth and fostering a love of dance. His work has brought him to diverse locations such as Japan, France, Greece, India, Mongolia, Paraguay, Poland, Malaysia, Russia, and the Philippines. His work has been supported by the U.S. Department of State, the National endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, and the Ford Foundation. Jonathan founded Battery Dance and Dancing to Connect to bridge divides, unite communities, empower youth, combat bullying and xenophobia. Jonathan will speak to how dance can ease conflict, breed trust and represent American values abroad.

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Filed under Arts & Culture, Fall 2017, Past Events