Robin Hemley, July 22, 2014

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“Exporting American Universities, MOOC’s and Yale in Singapore”

Exporting American universities—including the University of Iowa and others through MOOC’s—holds considerable fascination today. Robin Hemley will talk about his newest employer, Yale—NUS, Singapore’s first liberal arts college. He will share his thoughts and experiences with this new and exciting venture.

Robin Hemley holds a Bachelor’s degree in Comparative Literature from Indiana University in 1980, and subsequently earned a MFA in fiction in 1982.   Hemley is the recipient of Guggenheim Fellowship and others from the North Carolina Arts Council, the Ohioana Library Association, and the Washington State Arts Council. Beginning in 2004, Hemley served as the director of the Non-fiction Writing Program at the University of Iowa. Many of Hemley’s works have been published domestically and overseas, and has been included in publications including The New York Times, Orion, The Wall Street Journal, The Chicago Tribune, and New York Magazine. Most recently, Hemley lives in Singapore and serves as the Director of the Writer’s Centre at Yale University – Singapore.

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Filed under Arts & Culture, China & East Asia, Education

Barry Butler, July 9, 2014

“Wind Energy: A Global View as Seen from Iowa”

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Wind is an increasing source of renewable energy, both domestically and internationally. In recent years, 30-40% of all new electric generating capacity constructed in the U.S. has involved wind energy. Texas, Iowa and California lead the U.S. in wind energy production, but China leads on the global stage. While the U.S. currently produces only 4% of its electric power from wind, a study by the Department of Energy concludes that a goal of 20% could be achieved by 2030. Barry Butler’s goal is to provide the audience with an understanding of wind energy as a global renewable energy source. Butler will give a brief history of the industry as well as illustrate its societal impacts and possible growth in the coming years.

Barry Butler is the Executive Vice President and Provost at the University of Iowa. Prior to those appointments, Butler was dean of the UI College of Engineering, where he holds the rank of full professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in aeronautical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1979 and 1981, respectively. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1984, also from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He joined the University of Iowa faculty in 1984. He currently serves as co-chair of the American Wind Energy Association’s research and Development Committee.

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Filed under Environmental Issues

Nicholas Colangelo, June 24, 2014

Merrill pic“International is the Benchmark of a College Education”

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The mark of a major college of education is the vibrancy of its international aspect. This includes international students, international faculty, international partnerships, and international program offerings. Nicholas Colangelo will discuss what the UI College of Education is doing in terms of international education and share future directions. As Colangelo will assert, the idea of being a “global society” is not simply a catch phrase, but a foundation of college education.

Nicholas Colangelo is the Dean of the College of Education at the University of Iowa. He is also the Myron & Jacqueline Blank Professor of Gifted Education and Director Emeritus of The Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development. He has authored or edited numerous articles on counseling gifted students and the affective development of gifted and acceleration including Handbook of Gifted Education and co-authored “A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America’s Brightest Students.” Among numerous awards, he has been awarded the Distinguished Scholar Award by the National Association for Gifted Children, and the Hancher-Finkbine Medallion for Faculty from The University of Iowa In 2013.

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Filed under Education

Christopher Merrill, May 7, 2014

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“Reading Walt Whitman in Tehran”

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Christopher Merrill will discuss the University of Iowa’s first MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), which he co-developed with Whitman scholar and Roy J. Carver Professor of English Ed Folsom. The course covered Walt Whitman’s famous poem, Song of Myself, and ran for six weeks. In addition, Christopher is an ambitious world traveler, and has conducted cultural diplomacy missions in over 40 countries. He enjoys spreading and sharing the wisdom of Walt Whitman. Christopher Merrill is the Director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. He is the author of multiple works of nonfiction, several edited volumes, and six collections of poetry. He led the initiative which resulted in Iowa City becoming a UNESCO City of Literature. He serves on the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO. In 2012, President Barack Obama appointed Merrill to the National Council on the Humanities.

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Filed under Arts & Culture, The Middle East

Harilaos Stecopoulos, May 1, 2014

“Origins of US Cultural Diplomacy in the 1940s”

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Some foundations of current day US diplomacy lie in the cultural internationalism of the 1940’s.  By way of diplomats, authors and thinkers, some obscure, but equally influential figures became its respected architects including William Fulbright, Archibald MacLeish,  and Sumner Welles.  Harilaos Stecopoulos examines these figures and lays a foundation for understanding diplomacy of the period.

Harilaos Stecopoulos is Associate Professor of English at the University of Iowa, and the Editor of the prestigious The Iowa Review. Stecopoulos earned a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in English Literature.  He has authored several books, articles and book chapters, and is currently completing “Telling America’s Story to the World: The Literature of U.S. Diplomacy.”

 

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Filed under Arts & Culture, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy

Chris Anderson, Elena Osinskaya & Jill Anderson, April 23, 2014

“Regional Views of Ukraine’s Current Crisis” 

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The most urgent issue in international diplomacy continues to be the developing crisis in Ukraine.  policy makers and analysts around the world anxiously await developments to what some fear could become the largest forced annexation of European countries since the fall of the Soviet Union.  But, what started this crisis? Who are the Ukrainian people?  What is their relationship to Russia, and what are their perspectives on the crisis?  Three Iowans with substantial ties to the country will share insights on Ukrainian society and history and how regional differences have shaped recent events.

Chris Anderson is a Ph.D. candidate in the UI Department of Political Science studying comparative politics.  He has a BS in Economics from Iowa State, and a MA in Russian Studies from Jagiellonian University in Poland.  He is interested in democratization and nationalism in Ukraine and Georgia.   He has made more than a dozen trips back to Ukraine since 2004.

Elena Osinskaya was born in Ukraine, eventually earning her undergraduate in Moscow.  She is the Language Initiatives Manager in the UI Division of World Languages, Literatures and Cultures.  She is working towards  a Ph.D. in International and Comparative Education.

 

Jill Anderson is a Ph.D. candidate in the UI Department of Political Science, focusing on International Relations and Comparative Politics.  She holds a BA in Political Science from Central College.  As spent a 2 years teaching English in Yarmolyntsi, Ukraine as a Peace Corp Volunteer.

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Filed under Europe, Governance Issues, Past Events, U.S. Foreign Policy, War & Conflict

Adrien Wing, April 17, 2014

wing photo“Women’s Rights in Egypt After the Arab Spring” 

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In 2010, the small North African country of Tunisia received global attention when its citizens managed to overthrow their authoritarian government. The turmoil quickly spread to neighboring countries, resulting in massive protests and demonstrations across North Africa and the Middle East. In Egypt, long-time president Hosni Mubarak was overthrown. Many Egyptians hoped Mubarak’s deposition marked the beginning of a new time for Egypt, but that has seemingly not been the case. Professor Adrien Wing will discuss how the Arab Spring in Egypt has the lives of women. Have their lives improved? Worsened? Are the human rights of women more or less secure in post-revolution Egypt? Using thirty years of experience in the fields of law, history, and gender politics, Professor Wing will assess these questions.

 Adrien Wing is the Bessie Dutton Murray Professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, where she has taught since 1987. Additionally, she is the Director of the University of Iowa Center for Human Rights. She served as the Associate Dean for Faculty Development 2006-2009 and the on-site Director for the London Law Consortium semester abroad program 2010-12. She earned her B.A. at Princeton University, her M.A. at University of California Los Angeles, and her J.D. at Stanford Law School. Author of more than 100 publications, Wing is the editor of Critical Race Feminism: A Reader and Global Critical Race Feminism: An International Reader.

 

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Filed under Governance Issues, Humanitarian Issues, Past Events, The Middle East, War & Conflict